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Read Option

Posted: 09/05/2013 8:11 AM

Read Option 


Given NFL Teams are starting to use the Read Option more and more with the Mobile QB's, do you think NFL Defenses will be able to adjust to it like they did with the Wildcat or do you see this as a play that most defenses will not be able to contain. Thoughts???
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Posted: 09/05/2013 8:25 AM

Re: Read Option 


The read-option isn't a gimmick because it's based on a sound principle: when the quarterback reads a defender, he removes that defender from the play and creates a numerical advantage. That effect is real and cannot be taken away. In the past, the read-option (when it was run in the NFL) was run by quarterbacks who posed very little threat as passers so defenses could account for that lost defender by simply packing the box and moving their "lost" defender into the secondary. But with quarterbacks who are also excellent passers (Kaepernick, Griffin III, Wilson and maybe Newton), defenses who do that are exposing themselves to being thoroughly gashed by play-action.

I think defensive coordinators will come up with clever responses and the read-option will never be a magic bullet that always beats the defense. But it won't be removed as a useful tool, anymore than you can "remove" the slant or the counter-trap as an option. The most you can do is sacrifice defending other things to overplay it, in which case the threat of it is still providing benefit to the offense. I don't think teams will run the read-option as their base offense (as you could argue the Redskins and Panthers did, or came close to doing, last season), but it'll remain a useful tool in the kit for offenses with quarterbacks capable of running it to its full potential.
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Posted: 09/05/2013 8:28 AM

Re: Read Option 


Well, since all these defensive players saying they're just gonna 'hit the quarterback everytime'.  Some rules are going to have to be adjusted, i think.  It sounds like they (the refs) will protect the QB from unnecessary hits if he immediately retreats after handing the ball off, kind of like a normal handoff.  I'm pretty sure you can't just tee off on the QB after he gives the ball away on a normal handoff, but i don't know exactly the rule there (does anyone here know how that works?)...so IMO, you shouldn't be able to tee off on a Read Option QB if the ball is already out of his hands, and he's out of the play.
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Posted: 09/05/2013 8:32 AM

Re: Read Option 


I am interested to see how the refs will calll the hits after the play, I do know T. Suggs went after Kaep and that allowed Gore to eat them up, Defenses I guess are gonna have to decide who to take out of the play. I am interested to see how the Defenses around the NFL adjust to it if they can.
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Posted: 09/05/2013 8:44 AM

Re: Read Option 


There are already rules in place for this season, if a QB sets up in the read-option and appears to be in a throwing motion then he's protected from hits after the throw.  If he tucks it as in appearing to run outside the pocket then Def's can hit him if he decides to run it or hand it off sorta like they do in college.

LoneStar Niner
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Posted: 09/05/2013 8:46 AM

Re: Read Option 



NashvilleNiner wrote: Well, since all these defensive players saying they're just gonna 'hit the quarterback everytime'.  Some rules are going to have to be adjusted, i think.  It sounds like they (the refs) will protect the QB from unnecessary hits if he immediately retreats after handing the ball off, kind of like a normal handoff.  I'm pretty sure you can't just tee off on the QB after he gives the ball away on a normal handoff, but i don't know exactly the rule there (does anyone here know how that works?)...so IMO, you shouldn't be able to tee off on a Read Option QB if the ball is already out of his hands, and he's out of the play.

They talked to the vice president of officiating during the 49ers' third (I think) exhibition game about the rules regarding quarterback protection vis a vis the read-option. The rules basically boil down to:

-The quarterback has protection when "in a passing posture"...that is, either looking downfield with the ball at his hip or cocked to throw, or else actually in the midst of a passing motion
-The quarterback has no special protections when running the ball or carrying out a run fake
-The quarterback regains protections after a hand-off if he's fading backwards out of the play

That leads me to believe that even if the 49ers run read-options, they probably won't have Kaepernick carry out run-fakes if he hands off. It'll make the read-option minimally less effective, but the bulk of the value of the read-option is the decision-making at the mesh point (where the quarterback and running back come together to possibly hand-off) so the 49ers could still run the read-option and, if Kaepernick hands off, instruct him to fade back out of the play. They could also run read-options where if the defender crashes down on the running back, instead of running it, Kaepernick drops back to pass knowing a pass rusher has committed to the running back effectively taking him out of the play.

Last edited 09/05/2013 8:47 AM by Minstrel

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Posted: 09/05/2013 9:52 AM

Re: Read Option 


Its definitely going to be interesting how the ref's administer the 'retreating' or 'fading away' aspect of the read-option rule, as it seems like it may be very subjective...

Last edited 09/05/2013 9:53 AM by NashvilleNiner

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Posted: 09/05/2013 10:02 AM

Re: Read Option 


I think it effects it more then minimally, it can get that read defender to freeze long enough to be out of the play completely. 
Minstrel wrote:
NashvilleNiner wrote: Well, since all these defensive players saying they're just gonna 'hit the quarterback everytime'.  Some rules are going to have to be adjusted, i think.  It sounds like they (the refs) will protect the QB from unnecessary hits if he immediately retreats after handing the ball off, kind of like a normal handoff.  I'm pretty sure you can't just tee off on the QB after he gives the ball away on a normal handoff, but i don't know exactly the rule there (does anyone here know how that works?)...so IMO, you shouldn't be able to tee off on a Read Option QB if the ball is already out of his hands, and he's out of the play.

They talked to the vice president of officiating during the 49ers' third (I think) exhibition game about the rules regarding quarterback protection vis a vis the read-option. The rules basically boil down to:

-The quarterback has protection when "in a passing posture"...that is, either looking downfield with the ball at his hip or cocked to throw, or else actually in the midst of a passing motion
-The quarterback has no special protections when running the ball or carrying out a run fake
-The quarterback regains protections after a hand-off if he's fading backwards out of the play

That leads me to believe that even if the 49ers run read-options, they probably won't have Kaepernick carry out run-fakes if he hands off. It'll make the read-option minimally less effective, but the bulk of the value of the read-option is the decision-making at the mesh point (where the quarterback and running back come together to possibly hand-off) so the 49ers could still run the read-option and, if Kaepernick hands off, instruct him to fade back out of the play. They could also run read-options where if the defender crashes down on the running back, instead of running it, Kaepernick drops back to pass knowing a pass rusher has committed to the running back effectively taking him out of the play.
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Posted: 09/05/2013 10:16 AM

Re: Read Option 



DasDinga wrote: I think it effects it more then minimally, it can get that read defender to freeze long enough to be out of the play completely. 

The key defender, the one being read, is out of the play regardless assuming the quarterback makes the right decision. If the defender aggressively crashes hard on the running back, he's out of the play if the quarterback keeps or drops back. If the defender aggressively attacks the quarterback or waits to see what happens, he's out of the play if the ball is handed off.

What the run fake can accomplish is potentially causing secondary defenders, like the safety, to over-commit a step the wrong way. That has value, but that's a much smaller benefit than removing the key defender.
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Posted: 09/05/2013 11:48 AM

Re: Read Option 



Minstrel wrote:
NashvilleNiner wrote: Well, since all these defensive players saying they're just gonna 'hit the quarterback everytime'.  Some rules are going to have to be adjusted, i think.  It sounds like they (the refs) will protect the QB from unnecessary hits if he immediately retreats after handing the ball off, kind of like a normal handoff.  I'm pretty sure you can't just tee off on the QB after he gives the ball away on a normal handoff, but i don't know exactly the rule there (does anyone here know how that works?)...so IMO, you shouldn't be able to tee off on a Read Option QB if the ball is already out of his hands, and he's out of the play.

They talked to the vice president of officiating during the 49ers' third (I think) exhibition game about the rules regarding quarterback protection vis a vis the read-option. The rules basically boil down to:

-The quarterback has protection when "in a passing posture"...that is, either looking downfield with the ball at his hip or cocked to throw, or else actually in the midst of a passing motion
-The quarterback has no special protections when running the ball or carrying out a run fake
-The quarterback regains protections after a hand-off if he's fading backwards out of the play

That leads me to believe that even if the 49ers run read-options, they probably won't have Kaepernick carry out run-fakes if he hands off. It'll make the read-option minimally less effective, but the bulk of the value of the read-option is the decision-making at the mesh point (where the quarterback and running back come together to possibly hand-off) so the 49ers could still run the read-option and, if Kaepernick hands off, instruct him to fade back out of the play. They could also run read-options where if the defender crashes down on the running back, instead of running it, Kaepernick drops back to pass knowing a pass rusher has committed to the running back effectively taking him out of the play.

Yeah it was the third game they talked about it, it was explained and demonstrated very well.......your explanation was almost verbatim. Good job.  biggrin

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Posted: 09/06/2013 3:00 PM

Re: Read Option 


So, there's a slight nuance on what is legal/illegal when carrying out a run fake, as explained in the recently released video highlighting some of the new rules. According to Dean Blandino, the narrator of this video and the Vice President of Officiating (I believe the position once held by Mike Perreira), a QB can carry out a run fake, but once the QB is 'out of the play' (e.g., out of the pocket) unnecessary roughness protections re-apply.

The read-option portion of the video (this is a download video, btw, not a web-embedded one), starts at around the 6:30 mark.
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Posted: 09/06/2013 3:38 PM

Re: Read Option 


I think what is being missed with regards to the read option isn't the player that the QB is now in affect blocking, its the player who now is being blocked by someone OTHER than the QB farther down the play, and in almost every run play there are players like the back side defensive end or will backer will be unaccounted for in the blocking scheme because if they make the play, by the time they make it the plays far enough down field you're happy with the outcome of the play, qualifying it as a success.

In the NFL there are almost always 7 people in the box.  What the read option does is now put the running back in a one-on-one with another player in the box.  As a running backs coach, I always tell my backs that they have to make at least one guy miss on every play.  By force the single player to be on the running back by himself it puts the odds back in the offensive teams favor.  

For example, we run the zone read, and we always have a pass component as part of our offensive scheme.  That means that the 4 receivers we have on the field are actually running a route.  They will occupy the defensive backs just long enough to allow the rest of the offensive run scheme to do what it does.  Lets say for a minute that we're reading the defensive end on the play.  That means that the playside tackle now has the ability to get "back" to the linebacker and block him.  

What this has done is created a mismatch for the defense and now the're trying to play catch up.  At the NFL level, playing catch up is VASTLY harder to do than at any other level.

Last edited 09/06/2013 3:40 PM by plannb23

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Posted: 09/06/2013 4:57 PM

Re: Read Option 



plannb23 wrote: I think what is being missed with regards to the read option isn't the player that the QB is now in affect blocking, its the player who now is being blocked by someone OTHER than the QB farther down the play, and in almost every run play there are players like the back side defensive end or will backer will be unaccounted for in the blocking scheme because if they make the play, by the time they make it the plays far enough down field you're happy with the outcome of the play, qualifying it as a success.

In the NFL there are almost always 7 people in the box.  What the read option does is now put the running back in a one-on-one with another player in the box.  As a running backs coach, I always tell my backs that they have to make at least one guy miss on every play.  By force the single player to be on the running back by himself it puts the odds back in the offensive teams favor.  

For example, we run the zone read, and we always have a pass component as part of our offensive scheme.  That means that the 4 receivers we have on the field are actually running a route.  They will occupy the defensive backs just long enough to allow the rest of the offensive run scheme to do what it does.  Lets say for a minute that we're reading the defensive end on the play.  That means that the playside tackle now has the ability to get "back" to the linebacker and block him.  

What this has done is created a mismatch for the defense and now the're trying to play catch up.  At the NFL level, playing catch up is VASTLY harder to do than at any other level.
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Posted: 09/07/2013 2:32 AM

Re: Read Option 


I guess this is the reason CK went into intense physical weight training right after the Super Bowl.  

Think we will see the ol' Jeff Garcia jump pass incorporated into this formation?
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Posted: 09/09/2013 3:38 PM

Re: Read Option 


LOL Not sure how to take that so I'll just say thanks.  tongue
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