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David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the NFL

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Posted: 8/6/2014 11:08 PM

David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the NFL 


http://www.foxsports.com/nfl/s...-the-nfl-080614

David Wilson gets very emotional as he bids farewell to the NFL.

Good listen
There is no 'I' in team
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Posted: 8/7/2014 7:34 AM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


I watched the whole interview. Quite a young man he is. That guy has so much heart and passion, its hard to see him go off like that but he has no choice. It sounds like he took his schooling seriously and he appears to have a good head on his shoulders so I expect that he'll do just fine. Plus I'm sure the money he has made up to this point is enough to give him a very nice head start in life. I'm not sure of the numbers but he's probably made a few million in his three seasons, being a first round pick and all. I just checked and he was scheduled to make just under $1M this season. I figure he's made close to that his first two years so he'll have a nice nest egg to start off with. I wish him nothing but the best.

Good teams rely on their stars,
Great teams rely on each other.

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Posted: 8/7/2014 8:07 AM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


I love this kid and hope he's a big success in whatever he does next. He has a great attitude and incredible spirit.

It's a shame he couldn't play a few regular season games for us (he was three games away from qualifying for retirement benefits).
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Posted: 8/7/2014 2:19 PM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


Wilson will be paid the full $998,000 of his 2014 salary while on injured reserve. Under the labor agreement between the NFL and its players, he also is eligible for half of his $1.3 million 2015 salary.

He received a  3.3mm signing bonus as a rookie.  In addition he made  1.9mm in salary in 2012 and 2013. In total he will make 6.8mm.  Financially, he should be set for the rest of his life.
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Posted: 8/7/2014 2:27 PM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 



GordonG wrote: Wilson will be paid the full $998,000 of his 2014 salary while on injured reserve. Under the labor agreement between the NFL and its players, he also is eligible for half of his $1.3 million 2015 salary.

He received a  3.3mm signing bonus as a rookie.  In addition he made  1.9mm in salary in 2012 and 2013. In total he will make 6.8mm.  Financially, he should be set for the rest of his life.
The question with any of these guys is how much $$ is left when they walk away. They tend to think the money will keep on flowing, so, even though the NFL warns them, they don't save. The ones who really run into trouble are the guys who "have to" buy houses and cars for families and then "take care of my boys". Those are the ones who are penniless in a year's time. I hope Wilson took care of his parents - modestly - and stopped right there. Then, he will be set for life. Until someone talks him into opening a chain of restaurants. wink
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Posted: 8/7/2014 5:26 PM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


Wishing David Wilson the best life has to offer. Class act 100%
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Posted: 8/8/2014 8:24 AM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


Great job looking up what he made previously, thanks Gordon. Of that $6.8M, you'd have to think he probably pocketed about half of that after taxes and such, right? So lets say his net income was $3-$4M, that is probably enough to retire on, but who knows what he has done with the money as far as investing, giving some to charity or friends/family, and obviously how he's spent it on himself. Again, he seems like a smart guy with a good head on his shoulders so I doubt he blew through it, but who knows. If I had that kind of money I would not run out and buy some mansion and a chain of new cars. I'd live comfortably but modestly to ensure that the money stretches as far as it can. Nothing wrong with a very nice $350,000 house as opposed to some $2M mansion. Maybe spend $250,000 to put your parents in a nice house in a nice neighborhood (if they weren't already in one). After that, what else do you need other than one or two cars. Invest some of the leftover money smartly and try to find your next career without any real pressure.

p.s. I just realized that $350,000 for a house in a big city probably wouldn't be considered a "nice'" house. I'm in Rochester so that buys a helluva house here. Just wanted to explain my evaluation as opposed to someone living in NYC or California.

Good teams rely on their stars,
Great teams rely on each other.

Last edited 8/8/2014 8:28 AM by leagued

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Posted: 8/8/2014 9:35 AM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


I don't know David Wilson personally, but he comes across as an intelligent and responsible young man. Still, it's hard to say for sure that anyone is "set for life." Especially for professional athletes who live very different lifestyles than most of us. Six million doesn't go as far as you might think... if you're careless.

In 2009, Sports Illustrated claimed that 78% of ex-NFLers were bankrupt of financially stressed just two years after retirement.

Patrick Kerney:
"It's a lot of money, but when I talk to guys, I often say, you're only as wealthy as your lifestyle," 

Will Davis:
"I just seen a dinner bill for $30,000... WOW" #RookieNight

Eddie George:

"I've made millions and Iost millions," admits Eddie George, who was a first round draft pick in 1996 and went on to play nine seasons in the NFL as a running back. "I bought a ton of jewelry coming out, cars, a stereo system that was worth more than the car," George says. "I found out real quick that money and ignorance is not a good combination." He was once in a shop in Atlanta and was so excited they had gator shoes that fit his size 14 feet that he bought 20 pairs. He's pretty sure he never wore any of them.


Myron Rolle:

"Honestly, I didn't know about credit until I got to the NFL. I had a scholarship in college and didn't have to worry about that stuff," concedes Myron Rolle, a Rhodes Scholar who was drafted in 2010 by the Tennessee Titans. Rolle credits the NFL's Rookie Symposium, a two-and-a-half day event at the end of June, and the Titans' player development director for helping him think wisely about money. "The best advice I got was to remain humble," says Rolle, who left the NFL and is now in medical school. "There are veterans on the team who have six or seven cars they drive to practice and Louis Vuitton and Prada suits. If you give into that lifestyle, you go broke quickly."


Vernon Davis:
At the age of 22, his first NFL contract for $23 million over five-years made Davis the highest paid tight end in the league.  Coming quickly into fame and fortune, Davis soon realized that he needed to rely upon the insight of trusted individuals in order to secure his financial stability.  “When I first entered the NFL, I wasn’t prepared.  I didn’t know what to do.  I was kind of lost.

Bernie Kosar:
Longtime Cleveland Browns quarterback Bernie Kosar, who declared bankruptcy in 2009, estimates that he was at one time or another supporting somewhere between 25 and 50 families.
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Posted: 8/8/2014 10:02 AM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 



leagued wrote: After that, what else do you need other than one or two cars. 
Never forget an interview I saw with Charles Barkley. He said he was spending money faster than he could make it. He was buying top end cars - at least one a month. His "aha" moment came when Dr. J talked to him and asked him, "Charles, how many cars can you drive at one time?". Barkley said if Dr. J hadn't cornered him, he might have went bankrupt while he was still playing. I hope one of the Giants veteran leaders gave Wilson good advice if he was being reckless.
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Posted: 8/8/2014 12:09 PM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


Personally, I would find it hard to believe that Wilson has much of his initial bonus, or any of that other money, left in the till. I know for myself, if I just came into a big pay day, with future paydays all lined up, I would sort of go on a nice shopping spree for all those things that I couldn't afford for those other years in my life.
 Every athlete has to know that the payroll may one day be cut off, but he would never suspect that it would have been so soon. All these guys, never lived an upper middle class life so when that big pay day comes in, I'd bet my bottom dollar that he spent a good part of it on himself, and family, thinking that there is plenty more where this came from.
 I would also believe the Giants will take care of him in some way, to make sure he has a decent start in his next life.
There is no 'I' in team
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Posted: 8/8/2014 12:52 PM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


I agree Jintsfan. If I were to guess, I'd say he probably will have a million after all the rest of the money he's due. That's still pretty damn nice. Any of us would take that in a heart beat. So, he's got a nice nest egg while he decides what he wants to do with the rest of his life.

Good teams rely on their stars,
Great teams rely on each other.

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Posted: 8/8/2014 1:21 PM

Re: David Wilson sheds 'tears of joy' as he bids goodbye to the 


I know someone that has a little over a million with merrill lynch and that person is living very comfortably without the portfolio decreasing in value the last 7 years.   Modesty is the key ingredient but living on a million or two can be done.....

I hope David was smart with some of his money...
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