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ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm

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Posted: 1/21/2013 5:32 PM

ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 


http://espn.go.com/blog/new-yo...te-of-mets-farm

Not a ton there.  I'd say these were the main highlights:

“That said, we're very pleased with where our system is right now. Thanks to both our scouts and our development people, this is the most talented and deepest group of pitching prospects that I've been a part of in the past 20 years, and I've been fortunate to have been around some good ones. Our teams finished first in the league in ERA, WHIP and K/BB ratio -- a good trifecta -- in the Florida State League, the South Atlantic League, and the New York Penn League, and we did that with six-man rotations at each spot. Further, those staffs didn't include guys like Wheeler, Familia, Mejia, Harvey, etc. The best part, in my mind, is that our guys aren't just touch/feel guys who are old for their league and are good performers. Rather, these guys have stuff, command and performance. Of course, not all of them will make it, but we have enough of a mass to believe that some of them should. 

“Admittedly, our position players are behind our pitchers -- our pitchers led all of minor league baseball in ERA -- but we think we added some key guys in last year's draft, and some of our international players continue making progress. There are some position players we're very excited about. But, collectively, it's not as deep as the pitching. 

“All in all, more than a dozen of our players who haven't appeared in any top-10 list have been asked about this winter in major league trades, so other teams out there certainly like our depth. Then you add in the players we have acquired via trade, and we feel the system is close to reaching the level of being a true feeder system for the major league team.”

Last edited 1/21/2013 5:33 PM by DocK16

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Posted: 1/21/2013 5:55 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 


Some things he says are accurate and others not so much....


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Posted: 1/21/2013 5:59 PM

Re: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



DocK16 wrote: http://espn.go.com/blog/new-yo...te-of-mets-farm


“Admittedly, our position players are behind our pitchers -- our pitchers led all of minor league baseball in ERA -- but we think we added some key guys in last year's draft
What a liar, he is probably talking about Cecchini, but if Cecchini never hits a baseball again then he'll be a bust!!!!
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Posted: 1/21/2013 6:00 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 


“That said, we're very pleased with where our system is right now. Thanks to both our scouts and our development people.."

When I first read this, I read it as "I want to thank both of our scouts..."  I knew the Wilpons were making cuts to save more but that would have sent me into a rage had I not caught my error. biggrin
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Posted: 1/21/2013 6:00 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



xmulderx wrote: Some things he says are accurate and others not so much....

What'd he say that is inaccurate?
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Posted: 1/21/2013 6:20 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



DocK16 wrote:
xmulderx wrote: Some things he says are accurate and others not so much....

What'd he say that is inaccurate?
   as far as the bats go... I think he is overrating the system.


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Posted: 1/21/2013 6:30 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



xmulderx wrote:
DocK16 wrote:
xmulderx wrote: Some things he says are accurate and others not so much....

What'd he say that is inaccurate?
   as far as the bats go... I think he is overrating the system.

He acknowledged the bats were behind the pitchers and didn't really go out of his way to overhype the bats.  All he said was there were some position players drafted recently that they were excited about.  

Not sure what about that was inaccurate.  He stated it as opinion not fact.  Saying the bats are on par with the pitchers would be inaccurate.  He didn't say that at all.  In fact, he went out of his way to acknowledge that wasn't the case.
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Posted: 1/21/2013 6:34 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 


who are the key bats that were added in last years draft? to me they have ignored the OF completely, outside of Nimmo. Who was not exactly all he was cracked up to be himself in Brooklyn. He showed a real lack of mobility in the OF.


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Posted: 1/21/2013 6:58 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



xmulderx wrote: who are the key bats that were added in last years draft? to me they have ignored the OF completely, outside of Nimmo. Who was not exactly all he was cracked up to be himself in Brooklyn. He showed a real lack of mobility in the OF.

Well, their first three picks were bats: Cecchini, Plawecki, and Reynolds.  Just because they aren't OFers or slated for stardom doesn't mean he can't be excited about them and others.

Matt Reynolds, Arkansas, 3B 6-foot-1, 198 pounds

Playing for a top-notch program in one of the best college conferences in the country, Reynolds has been seen by plenty of scouts. And while he might not be among the top tier of college bats in this class, he has some skills that could translate at the next level. With a balanced set-up at the plate, Reynolds has a good approach and hits line drives. He doesn't have a ton of power, mostly to the gaps, and is more consistent to the pull side. Without average power, Reynolds will have to learn how to hit to all fields. He's a heads-up baserunner who will swipe some bases even without particularly good speed. He's a very good defender, with the potential to be above average with his arm and fielding to go along with solid average range. Reynolds plays mostly third, but has seen time at shortstop, and that kind of flexibility will only help his value. If the bat doesn't progress, he could have a very good future as a utility type.

Sounds scrappy.  You know you love players like that. biggrin  I'm not saying he's a future stud, but best case he could be a Garin Cecchini type -- B prospect for the Red Sox with limited pop and upside but a really good skill set.  




I know Kaupe is considered a joke by most, but here's a report on him:

Perfect Game USA:

Scouts from the mainland got an early look at the top high-school talent in Hawaii, and left with the impression that the 5-foot-5, 175-pound Kaupe was the best talent in this year’s class. Despite his obvious lack of size, Kaupe showcased impressive speed and solid actions at shortstop, though he probably faces a shift across the bag to second base as he advances. Kaupe also showed some ability as a switch-hitter to drive balls.


6th rounder Jayce Boyd:


Baseball America:

Boyd was an acclaimed prep player and has been a three-year starter for Florida State. He led the Atlantic Coast Conference in batting at .395 entering regional play. He has adjusted his approach and swing since high school, when he was a 19th-round pick as a third baseman. He has become a contact hitter with gap power, hitting 16 homers his first two seasons but just three this spring. He’s an above-average defender at first with good hands, but hasn’t gotten much exposure in college at third, which obviously would increase his value. His lack of home run power and righthanded-hitting first-base profile makes him tough to peg from a draft standpoint.

Perfect Game USA:

The 6-foot-3, 200-pound Boyd has been a consistent run producer for the Seminoles from the start of his freshman year, but has never developed the raw power scouts believe he has. He hit eight homers in each of his first two seasons, but has dropped to just two as a junior, even as he leads the Seminoles with a .393 average. Although Boyd has played third base in the past, he profiles best at first, and scouts continue to dream on his polished righthanded bat—and untapped power potential.


8th rounder Tomas Nido:

Baseball America:

Nido isn’t quite one-tool player; the Florida State signee has average arm strength. But his calling card is plus-plus raw power, as he has strength and takes a big, powerful swing, generating above-average bat speed. He’s a slow-twitch athlete, and it may be a stretch for him to stay behind the plate. He has a tendency to sell out for power, even though he doesn’t need to with his strength. Nido had late helium and was doing some individual workouts for teams, and if he puts on a power display with wood, he could be drafted highly.

Perfect Game USA:

Along with de la Rosa (No. 26), Nido is the second catcher on the list who grew up in Puerto Rico and retains strong connections with his homeland. Cross-checkers who see the 6-foot-1, 195-pound Nido on the right day could have him higher than this as his raw power from the right side is a separator tool. He can put on shows in BP, but is a streaky in-game hitter who will swing-and-miss his share, but also crush balls on occasion against high-velocity pitching. His arm strength grades out as a plus behind the plate.


Stefan Sabol had a solid debut:


Baseball America:

Sabol’s physicality and upside made him a high-profile prospect coming out of high school, but he elected to go to Oregon, where a broken bone his left hand spoiled his freshman season. He transferred to Orange Coast for his sophomore year but was sidelined by a broken hamate bone. His performance was pedestrian when he returned to action, but his raw tools haven’t gone away. Though he saw some action behind the plate this spring, the overwhelming scouting consensus is that he lacks the agility, hands and footwork to catch. He figures to find a home at an outfield corner in pro ball, and he is a solid runner for his size. He has average or even slightly better raw arm strength, but it isn’t particularly playable in games because of his long arm action and inaccuracy. Sabol’s bat and power will have to carry him. He hasn’t developed as a hitter, but he does have pitch recognition and plenty of bat speed, which leads to plus raw power. Unlocking that power in games will be key. Sabol is committed to Oklahoma State.

Perfect Game USA:

As a highly-athletic high-school catcher in 2010, Sabol drew plenty of early-round interest in that year’s draft, and participated in the 2009 PG/Aflac All-American Classic. After spending his first year in college at the University of Oregon, he transferred to Orange Coast and broke the hamate bone in his left hand just before the start of the 2012 season. Because of that Sabol hasn’t looked as strong as he tries to catch up, but still has promising athleticism and power potential at the plate with defensive versatility.

http://www.amazinavenue.com/20...cap-rounds-1-40


Who knows what will become of those players, but there's nothing misleading, inaccurate, or disingenuous about PDP's enthusiasm about last season's draft.

Last edited 1/21/2013 7:02 PM by DocK16

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Posted: 1/21/2013 7:02 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



xmulderx wrote: who are the key bats that were added in last years draft? to me they have ignored the OF completely, outside of Nimmo. Who was not exactly all he was cracked up to be himself in Brooklyn. He showed a real lack of mobility in the OF.

Going into the draft, the farm was thin at Catcher, SS, and the OF.  Seriously addressing 2 of 3 aint bad.  You might not like the fact that OF wasn't seriously addressed (there's no argueing that), but to produce 1 major league SS, you have to draft several.  Players just don't stick at that positon that often.  Look it up, even Gregg Jefferies was drafted as a SS.  He had hands like bricks/
Mets trade away reigning CY Young award winner.
Still have the best pitcher in Baseball.
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Posted: 1/21/2013 7:06 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



VAMetsFan wrote:
xmulderx wrote: who are the key bats that were added in last years draft? to me they have ignored the OF completely, outside of Nimmo. Who was not exactly all he was cracked up to be himself in Brooklyn. He showed a real lack of mobility in the OF.

Going into the draft, the farm was thin at Catcher, SS, and the OF.  Seriously addressing 2 of 3 aint bad.  You might not like the fact that OF wasn't seriously addressed (there's no argueing that), but to produce 1 major league SS, you have to draft several.  Players just don't stick at that positon that often.  Look it up, even Gregg Jefferies was drafted as a SS.  He had hands like bricks/

The common theme in all those scouting reports was "good athlete", meaning defensive shifts are a possibility.  None are glued to any one position.  I'd rather draft players with a chance to play a premium position than players who have no chance of playing anywhere but corner OF or 1B.
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Posted: 1/21/2013 7:34 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 


I just disagree is all on what he said on the bats... when you say you think you drafted "key" guys this past year... then that is more than an opinion coming from a key guy in the organization. None of those guys are likely going to equate to anything significant and wind up being a "key" piece going forward IMO.


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Posted: 1/21/2013 7:42 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



xmulderx wrote: I just disagree is all on what he said on the bats... when you say you think you drafted "key" guys this past year... then that is more than an opinion coming from a key guy in the organization. None of those guys are likely going to equate to anything significant and wind up being a "key" piece going forward IMO.

You're arguing the semantics of the word "key".  In your mind, that probably means difference-makers.  In his, I assume it means guys with the potential to make the bigs in some capacity.  Cecchini and Plawecki definitely have that potential, even if neither projects to be a star or even better than average.  Two from the same draft class, especially under the new CBA, is a strong yield.

Ultimately, it's his interpretation that matters, not yours.  Not saying that to be a jerk, but if you take "key" to be difference-maker and he doesn't, then you're the one who is wrong, not him.

Last edited 1/21/2013 7:48 PM by DocK16

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Posted: 1/21/2013 8:00 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 


i don't think DePo is a dummy, it is very clear to me he chose the word key for a reason... anyways moving on.


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Posted: 1/21/2013 9:57 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 


For Vandy:

    1. @ pdepo Would you say the Mets are going after players with uncommon/awesome names?

    @ DerpyMets Cool names are definitely a focus. Remember, I've been with organizations that drafted guys like Sabathia, Zito and Olabisi.


hearts.gif
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Posted: 1/21/2013 10:32 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



DocK16 wrote: For Vandy:

    1. @ pdepo Would you say the Mets are going after players with uncommon/awesome names?

    @ DerpyMets Cool names are definitely a focus. Remember, I've been with organizations that drafted guys like Sabathia, Zito and Olabisi.


hearts.gif

Cool names are the new market inefficiency.


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Posted: 1/21/2013 10:32 PM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



omnimetfan wrote: “That said, we're very pleased with where our system is right now. Thanks to both our scouts and our development people.."

When I first read this, I read it as "I want to thank both of our scouts..."  I knew the Wilpons were making cuts to save more but that would have sent me into a rage had I not caught my error. biggrin
Too easy, my friend, too easy... laugh.gif


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Posted: 1/22/2013 12:33 AM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



DocK16 wrote: For Vandy:

    1. @ pdepo Would you say the Mets are going after players with uncommon/awesome names?

    @ DerpyMets Cool names are definitely a focus. Remember, I've been with organizations that drafted guys like Sabathia, Zito and Olabisi.


hearts.gif
This Olabisi fellow's full name is Babawande Onaolapo Olabisi and it seems like he's not even playing professional baseball right now. That means he's available. How come Sandy/PDP haven't signed him?
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Posted: 1/22/2013 12:35 AM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



RSVandy wrote:
DocK16 wrote: For Vandy:

    1. @ pdepo Would you say the Mets are going after players with uncommon/awesome names?

    @ DerpyMets Cool names are definitely a focus. Remember, I've been with organizations that drafted guys like Sabathia, Zito and Olabisi.


hearts.gif
This Olabisi fellow's full name is Babawande Onaolapo Olabisi and it seems like he's not even playing professional baseball right now. That means he's available. How come Sandy/PDP haven't signed him?
This guy sounds pretty great:
http://www.milb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20101110& amp;content_id=16061004&vkey=news_milb&fex t=.jsp

But athletic and intellectual pursuits need not be mutually exclusive. Olabisi spends the offseason back within the confines of academia, engaged in tasks that require equal measures of creativity and pragmatism. Having obtained an undergraduate degree in biochemical engineering, he has returned to Stanford to pursue a master's in management science and engineering. This line of coursework will further Olabisi's goal of creating, producing and distributing economical and efficient medical devices for developing countries.
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Posted: 1/22/2013 9:41 AM

RE: ESPN NY interview: PDP on the state of the farm 



Absentminded wrote:
DocK16 wrote: For Vandy:

    1. @ pdepo Would you say the Mets are going after players with uncommon/awesome names?

    @ DerpyMets Cool names are definitely a focus. Remember, I've been with organizations that drafted guys like Sabathia, Zito and Olabisi.


hearts.gif

Cool names are the new market inefficiency.
biggrin
"Maybe it's time to make some moves."  - Sandy Alderson
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