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New APR Details

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Posted: 06/11/2013 12:10 PM

New APR Details 


RELEASE:

BERKELEY - 
With an average score of 975 in the latest Academic Progress Rate (APR) multiyear scores announced by the NCAA Tuesday, Golden Bear student-athletes continue to perform well in the classroom to complement their success in the athletic arena. At the same time, the most recent data suggests that a broad range of steps recently taken to improve the football team's academic performance are beginning to have the desired effect.

Based on statistics through August 2012, the Cal men's and women's tennis and women's gymnastics teams posted APR scores of 1,000 - the highest possible - and were publicly recognized for their high achievements by the NCAA last week. A total of 12 Golden Bear squads had APRs of 985 or better, with five teams above 990. Overall, Cal's average team score was at least 975 for the fourth year in a row, with 13 different teams publicly honored by the NCAA for their APR performances during that span.

Each year, the NCAA tracks the classroom performance of student-athletes on every Division I team through the annual scorecard of academic achievement, known as APR. The rate measures eligibility, graduation and retention each semester or quarter and provides a clear picture of the academic performance in each sport. The most recent APRs are multi-year rates based on scores from the 2008-09, 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-2012 academic years.

"We have an obligation to provide our student-athletes the resources they need to succeed in all facets of their collegiate experience," Director of Athletics Sandy Barbour said. "While much public attention is paid to exploits in athletics, accomplishments in academics are just as important here at Cal. It has to be part of our culture, from the administration through our coaches and the student-athletes themselves. We all share that responsibility. While many of our teams sport outstanding APR scores, we still have work to do and won't be satisfied until all of our programs are achieving at a high level."

In particular, emphasis has been placed on the Cal football program, which ranks 12th in the Pac-12 with a multiyear APR score of 935. While the Bears were second in the conference every year from 2005-09, the team's scores have fallen in recent years, and the football coaching staff and athletic department administration have introduced several measures to improve the results.

"One of the specific reasons behind the hiring of Sonny Dykes as our football coach last fall was his commitment to academic performance," Barbour said. "From the beginning, he has instituted standards for accountability and expectations for the entire team as it relates to academics. It may take some time for the scores to reflect the progress we are making, but it is clear that we are moving in the right direction."

Among the steps taken recently are

• holding monthly meetings with athletic department leadership, the faculty athletic representative, academic advisors and Coach Dykes to review the team's academic improvement plan;
• increasing the number of academic staff who work directly with the football program to help understand and manage problems before they arise;
• encouraging players to take more challenging classes earlier in their careers to avoid the distractions that can come in a final season that can keep them from finishing their degrees;
• focusing on recruiting prospects who fit in better academically at Cal;
• establishing policies for student-athletes in their final semester that they must graduate or leave school in good academic standing in order to continue to train at the Simpson Center or in Memorial Stadium;
• encouraging former players to return to campus to complete their degree work.

"Our football team has some challenges in front of us," said Dykes, who became Cal's football coach last December. "We all know that we need to improve academically, and we set those expectations at our very first meeting. When our players wake up in the morning, I want them to say that their primary focus is to get a degree from Cal. Grades from the spring semester reflected that new-found commitment, and I expect the trend to continue as we move into the fall and beyond."

While the APR numbers announced Tuesday are based on figures before Dykes arrived on campus, actions taken by the football program, some of which were implemented well over a year ago, have shown immediate results. A combined 21 football players graduated at the end of the recently completed fall and spring semesters and another two are on track to earn their degrees this summer. In addition, the football team's combined GPA for the spring 2013 semester was its highest in at least five years, more than three-tenths of a point above its GPA for spring 2012.

Similar measures have been implemented with other programs as needed. After initially posting low results, men's basketball scores have risen in six of the past seven years following the introduction of an academic improvement plan. Softball has also seen its APR scores go up a remarkable 46 points in the last two years to a current value of 965. And while women's basketball's four-year APR average fell to 941, its year-by-year scores have climbed 43 points since 2009 with a higher score anticipated next year, which should produce an improved four-year rate.

Ryan Gorcey
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Posted: 06/11/2013 1:39 PM

RE: New APR Details 


This is going to be fun

Northwestern and ohio state are ranked in top ten apr scores

Cal ranked 96 out of 118 division one schools

1 Northwestern University: 995
2 Boise State University 989
2 Duke University 989
4 Ohio State University 988
5 University of Northern Illinois 987
6 Rice University 986
7 Clemson University 983
7 Middle Tennessee State University 983
9 Rutgers University 982
10 Air Force Academy 980
10 University of Miami 980
12 Vanderbilt University 978

96. Cal. 935
Buckeye in California

Last edited 06/11/2013 1:40 PM by CalBuck79

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  • BluesandGold2
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Posted: 06/11/2013 4:12 PM

An old discussion 


It's a lot harder to pass classes at Berkeley than, say, Middle Tennessee State University.  This is my long-standing gripe with the APR.  Classes at Cal are a lot more demanding than they are at all but a few institutions, hence other schools have an easier time with this than at Cal.

A few years ago I noted an amusing statistic: 92 percent of Harvard undergraduates graduate with honors.  What does it mean to graduate with honors when more than nine out of ten do so?  That you didn't show up drunk to class?  One might argue that it's so hard to get into Harvard that only A students make it in... hence almost all grades are A's.  (Stepford used to make the same argument).  However, one could say the same thing for Cal undergraduates, yet Berkeley does not have the same grade inflation as these private institutions.  I doubt stepford or usc will ever have APR problems even though I'm convinced (and, admittedly, biased) that usc's football team is not filled with intellectual titans.

One might argue that APR measures how well an institution progresses its athletes through their programs of study.  This should factor into which athletes it targets.  Yet all institutions make exceptions in admissions policies for athletes, and once admitted to, say, stepford, well, the challenge is over (as it is, ironically, with Middle Tennessee State) except as it pertains to athletics.

I understand that the APR was instituted to address the football mills that were the SEC, yet it is a far from perfect solution.
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Posted: 06/11/2013 8:34 PM

Re: An old discussion Post Rating (1 vote)


If ucla can be second in the PAC 12, I see little excuse for Cal.
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Posted: 06/11/2013 10:34 PM

Re: New APR Details Post Rating (1 vote)


When you put aside all the excuses and happy talk, Cal is still dead last in football APR in the Pac12. We're talking graduating, not making Phi Beta Kappa.
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  • BluesandGold2
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Posted: 06/12/2013 9:17 AM

Re: New APR Details Post Rating (1 vote)


Should Cal have done better?  Probably.  However, this does not diminish my objections to APR.
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  • CAL4LIFE
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Posted: 06/12/2013 10:12 AM

Re: New APR Details Post Rating (1 vote)



BluesandGold2 wrote: Should Cal have done better?  Probably.  However, this does not diminish my objections to APR.
Not probably, there is no question they should have done better. In 2008-09 they achieved a 963 which was in the upper third of the conference, so achieving an acceptable score inside the framework of the APR metric was more than doable.

What I find hilarious right now is twofold: (1) the Tedford apologists are now angry with the man for dropping the ball (which is so easy too do after the fact), and (2) the APR metric is somehow flawed because Cal is such a rigorous academic institution, thus comparing Cal to other schools is somehow an apples and oranges topic. Of course the latter is a total straw man on every level.

Here's a thought which is seemingly very hard for the Cal community to actually convey among themselves. Instead of trying to crap on the system and explain away Cal's inability to achieve, why not be real and start asking for some accountability from inside IAD. Forget all the PR platitudes on calbears.com, something tangible is more appropriate like ....make it happen or you're fired.

Last edited 06/12/2013 10:15 AM by CAL4LIFE

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Posted: 06/12/2013 11:51 AM

Re: New APR Details 


For those who wondered about sanctions, they do not go into effect until a team drops below an APR score of 925. But, the rules have recently been reformed so that teams are required to have a 930 average by the 2015-16 academic year to be postseason eligible.

Because the Cal football team scored a 963 in the 08-09 year, it needs at least 943 next year to maintain a multiyear average higher than 930 and remain postseason eligible. The program needs at least a 923 -- the same score it got this year -- to keep its average above the 925 score that currently means sanctions (postseason ineligibility, scholarship reductions, etc.)
Ryan Gorcey
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Posted: 06/12/2013 3:23 PM

Re: New APR Details Post Rating (1 vote)



CAL4LIFE wrote:
BluesandGold2 wrote: Should Cal have done better?  Probably.  However, this does not diminish my objections to APR.
Not probably, there is no question they should have done better. In 2008-09 they achieved a 963 which was in the upper third of the conference, so achieving an acceptable score inside the framework of the APR metric was more than doable.

What I find hilarious right now is twofold: (1) the Tedford apologists are now angry with the man for dropping the ball (which is so easy too do after the fact), and (2) the APR metric is somehow flawed because Cal is such a rigorous academic institution, thus comparing Cal to other schools is somehow an apples and oranges topic. Of course the latter is a total straw man on every level.

Here's a thought which is seemingly very hard for the Cal community to actually convey among themselves. Instead of trying to crap on the system and explain away Cal's inability to achieve, why not be real and start asking for some accountability from inside IAD. Forget all the PR platitudes on calbears.com, something tangible is more appropriate like ....make it happen or you're fired.

Check out this link:

http://www.stanforddaily.com/2011/03/09/1046687/

There are certain realities that transcend whether one is, was, or will become a Tedford apologist.  I'm not kidding myself that this couldn't happen at Cal, but the fact that it does happen does, in my mind, make this assessment process non-comparable.
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Posted: 06/13/2013 8:44 AM

Re: New APR Details 


That 2010 class sure isn't helping us: http://california.scout.com/a....c=8&yr=2010

These guys all left: 
Terrance Montgomery
Kaelin Clay
Trajuan Briggs
Tevin Carter
Cecil Whiteside
Chris Martin
Possibly Chris McCain??
Did Maynard graduate or leave in good standing?
Did KA leave in good standing?

I think Trajuan was in good academic standing and Chris Martin never really enrolled so I'm not sure if they hurt us.
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Posted: 06/13/2013 10:07 AM

Re: New APR Details 



BluesandGold2 wrote: Should Cal have done better?  Probably.  However, this does not diminish my objections to APR.
Is the APR complete BS as a rubric?  Probably.  However, this does not diminish my disappointment in the Tedford regime for letting graduation rates decline to the point where we are at serious risk of penalties. 

The APR might be a poor measure of student-athlete success in the classroom, but it's the measure that matters.  Think of it as like the SAT.  Everyone knows the SAT is crap.  But it matters.  So you better be ready for it, because whining about how ridiculous the SAT is won't get you into a better college.
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Posted: 06/13/2013 6:31 PM

Re: New APR Details 




---------------------------------------------
--- RyanGorcey wrote:

For those who wondered about sanctions, they do not go into effect until a team drops below an APR score of 925. But, the rules have recently been reformed so that teams are required to have a 930 average by the 2015-16 academic year to be postseason eligible.

Because the Cal football team scored a 963 in the 08-09 year, it needs at least 943 next year to maintain a multiyear average higher than 930 and remain postseason eligible. The program needs at least a 923 -- the same score it got this year -- to keep its average above the 925 score that currently means sanctions (postseason ineligibility, scholarship reductions, etc.)

---------------------------------------------

Seems too close for comfort...
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