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Re: Haslam returns to Pilot the Truck Stops

Posted: 2/11/2013 4:49 PM

Re: Haslam returns to Pilot the Truck Stops 


OTTER:

The breathless media reports at the time were laughably inaccurate when they portrayed him handing over his family company's reigns and focusing solely on the Browns.

AA:

Do these seem like unreasonable interpretations of events?

For Browns fans, this could be considered a positive development, as Haslam should now have significantly more time to run his new football franchise. That could be a stark contrast from the team's previous ownership headed by Randy Lerner, who never had a reputation for being deeply committed to running the organization.

http://cleveland.sbnation.com/cleveland-browns/201 2/9/12/3321380/jimmy-haslam-browns-owner-pilot-fly ing-j

The news broke late last night and most Cleveland outlets have picked it up already by now, but it is still important to note. What this means for the future is unknown, but it at least indicates the Browns could have a much more watchful steward than Randy Lerner going forward, something that became evident when Jimmy Haslam was in Pat Shurmur’s press conference following the opening week loss to the Philadelphia Eagles.

http://www.waitingfornextyear.com/2012/09/jimmy-ha slam-hires-his-replacement-at-pilot-flying-j/

At Haslam’s introductory press conference as Browns future owner on Aug. 3, he was asked how much time he intended to spend in Cleveland on football business.

“We’ll split our time between Knoxville and Cleveland,” Haslam said. “I’m still going to be CEO of Pilot Flying J. It’s a big company and I’ll spend a pretty good amount of time running that, but we’ll take, as I said earlier, whatever time necessary in Cleveland really to do two things: one, to bring a winner back here, but number two, to become a part of the Cleveland community.”

The only reasonable conclusion you can reach is that Haslam has spent enough time walking the halls of Berea, examining the books, and, yes, sitting in on personnel meetings, to realize there is a lot of work to be done immediately with the Browns.


http://espncleveland.com/common/more.php?m=49& post_id=4851

Lot of COULD's and cautious optimism from the media.  If there were breathless assumptions, they were coming from fans.  Still, a bit of bloviating with the "whatever time necessary in Cleveland... to bring a winner."  Guess he meant a winning front office.


And while I'm no fan of Mike Florio, he does hit the nail with this...

Former Browns owner Randy Lerner was criticized for being an absentee landlord.  New Browns owner Jimmy Haslam suddenly is, well, an absentee landlord.

Six months after stepping down as CEO of Pilot Flying J, Haslam has returned, according to the Knoxville News Sentinel.  Haslam replaces former PepsiCo president John Compton, who will remain as a strategic adviser.  (Which could mean he’ll eventually fade away quietly in lieu of being publicly poop-canned now.)

Still, Haslam is saying, “It’s not him, it’s me.”  Sort of.


“This is about me realizing my first love is running Pilot Flying J and wanting to return to that job,” Haslam said.

In a statement released to Mary Kay Cabot of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, spokesman Neal Gulkis said of Haslam’s move, “It’s not going to affect his involvement with the team nor is it going to have any impact on the operations of the Browns.”

As a practical matter, however, the move nudges CEO Joe Banner into the Mike Holmgren role.  With Haslam out of the picture on a day-to-day basis and ensconced in the family business that helped him earn the money to buy the Browns, Banner is now the lead dog in the Dawg Pound.


http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2013/02/11/ne w-browns-owner-returns-to-his-former-job/

So if people want to say Lerner gave up and gave the keys to Walrus, how is this any different with Haslam and Banner? 

Mind you, it's not necessarily a bad tact.  Haslam is not claiming to be an NFL expert, so he's letting the football people handle the football stuff. 

But same tact in the front office, different reaction from fans.

OTTER:

He bought a house and people think that means he was becoming a Clevelander.  I wish I had a giant eyeroll icon. 

AA:

Agree.  It just meant he didn't want to stay in a hotel on on home game weekends. 
Far more palatable than landing at Burke Sunday morning and flying out 12 hours later.

OTTER:

He needed to take enough time to set up his new billion dollar enterprise.  He's done that.  He's happy with where it is.  Now he's going to get back to his real family legacy.

AA:

Well, we don't quite know for he had enought time to set it all up and be happy with it. 
We DO know that whatever he's done is enough for him to declare now is time to return to the family business.

OTTER:

Honestly what the hell does an owner do for a football team in the offseason? 

AA:

Strangely, never heard that asked of any owner from Modell on down. 

Indeed, what does an owner do DURING the season... beyond showing up for games and an obligatory walk around Berea within the first few days of tc?

How much time do owners spend on team business... versus the business that made them all the money in the first place?

How many owners eventually divested themselves from their businesses to make their team a full time devotion?

How hands on/off will Haslam be compared to other NFL owners?

And does it really matter as long as he hired the right people to run the football side?

Lots of questions for the beat writers to research in the coming weeks.

Personally, I would have been more comfortable with this move had at least another year gone by, the team was obviously improving, and the proof was there that a good management team was in place... and that Haslam could say, "Mission Accomplished."
with a little more conviction than if he was wearing a flight suit.
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