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Art's Porn Theatre

Posted: 2/8/2013 5:04 PM

Art's Porn Theatre 


Agree that the game had passed Paul Brown by to some extent, or he had become a little too self satisfied to keep up.  But even before Graham retired, there was some grumbling that PB's offensive schemes were getting stale.

In fairness, Modell was not a big "my way or the highway" kinda guy.  He revered Brown and left the football side to him.  But PB was just so imperious and dictatorial in his old age, it was like he saw such deference as a weakness to be spit upon.  Some say that Modell alienated the players against him.  Actually I think they shared a bond of both being under PB's thumb, and could identify with each other.

When Ernie Davis was found to have leukemia, Modell wanted some way, any way, to simply put him out on the field in a cursory way in preseason as a morale booster to him, the players and the fans.  PB would have nothing to do with it.  Whether it was medically wise or not, I don't know.  But I think Modell felt like he wasn't asking for much, and just got dumped on at every turn.  PB really brought his firing upon himself.

As for the idea of MNF, the usual lightweight sources say Pete Rozelle.  But I'm wondering if the tv committee didn't generate the idea, and then Rozelle, as Commissioner, was the designated point man with the networks.   It's like a lot of work done in the NFL by committees.  It starts with them, and then the Commissioner has the job of carrying it out.  Didn't mean it was his idea.

Living in Pittsburgh at the time of the Move, I didn't get too many particulars.  It just struck me that Art had to work overtime with rationales when the reaction against the move was even more vocal than he anticipated.  He just wasn't proactive and was always well behind the curve.   If an owner wants to stay, he will.   He'll work it out.  Modell was like the desperate gambler who knew his debts would be forgiven, if he just told the collector where his federal prosecutor daughter lived, the one trying to convict the local mobster. 

Remember when the Indians were hot and the Jake was new?  Remember when some national game would show a glitzy new stadium and announcers would talk about how it was all part of the city's great comeback?

Hmm, what were those cosmetic moments that helped make Cleveland the Mistake on the Lake?  Besides the obvious like the Cuyahoga catching fire?

IMO, one was the MLB All-Star game in 1981.  It provided the nation a rare opportunity to see a night game in cavernously dark Municipal Stadium.  What a scary looking dump (and it was far worse watching a local weeknight telecast with 6k bodies sprinkled among 78k seats).  I know, I was there.  And I was sitting in the upper deck, six rows from the top, in the second to last section from the bleachers.  With the exception of someone watching the new LA Dodgers from right field in the Coliseum, no human beings could be as far away from home plate.  

I have great memories growing up to games there, but the realization then and there, having gone away and come back home, was that it was waaay beyond time to build new stadiums (and that was around the time that the multi-use stadiums had been around long enough that people could see they weren't so hot, especially for baseball). 

Maybe it didn't turn out as a great idea ending up in Doo Dah Land, but at least Nick Miletti knew that he couldn't be in the Cleveland Arena any longer than necessary.

Whether Modell was an owner or a tenant, making fixes or demanding them be made were secondary when the fans showed up in droves.  The Muni was like a giant porn theatre.  Seats falling apart, plaster off the ceiling, the restroom is a biohazard... but if they keep showing up every Sunday for the double bill (where's Bernie's daughter?), then there was no incentive to fix anything.   That would go against my bottom line.

If you build it, they will come?  I don't have to spend a dime on a 2 x 4, and they're coming anyway!  It's all money!

But then new stadiums with loges meant that money could be made on a lot more than just butts in seats.  Only you can't put flashy loges in an old downtown porn theatre. 

Modell missed the boat by a good solid decade, so then needed to sell his soul for a financial out.  He waited too long, then expected others to fix it for him.  He went years grudgingly accepting what he had, and then when city fathers told him his turn would come, he suddenly couldn't wait another second.

And for all this, the guy warrants being a finalist for the HOF? 

A little overkill on the gold star for attendance.
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  • redright
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Posted: 2/8/2013 6:42 PM

Re: Art's Porn Theatre 


V

When Ernie Davis was found to have leukemia, Modell wanted some way, any way, to simply put him out on the field in a cursory way in preseason as a morale booster to him, the players and the fans.  PB would have nothing to do with it.  Whether it was medically wise or not, I don't know.  But I think Modell felt like he wasn't asking for much, and just got dumped on at every turn.  PB really brought his firing upon himself

R

One side of the story and it was the starting or ending point.  I've read Paul didn't want to have Ernie Davis used.  Ernie was not football ready and Paul bristled at the thought of Art wanting to get some return on his investment in Davis.  Not surprisingly, I am on the good for Paul Brown showing character and standing up to Modell. A lot of coaches would have let the boss have his way without regard for the player, man, Ernie Davis.

Nice report.
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Posted: 3/6/2013 11:54 AM

Re: Art's Porn Theatre 


"He went years grudgingly accepting what he had, and then when city fathers told him his turn would come, he suddenly couldn't wait another second."

-- And that- to me- is the real bottom-line. Put aside any quibbles about who did what to who. Fascinating, but it's beside the point.

Why should the Modells or the Irsays or any other owner be put in a position where they can do things as they see fit- even if it means cheap-shotting the fans or the community that has been a patron for the team? Why should any owner be independent from the community- which gives the team it's persona and provides it a marketplace- and be allowed the power to do things as they see fit? 

A fundamental change to the power structure of pro sports is overdue. A change that will have financial ramifications that may help fans even as it moderates the now deep pockets of administrators and players. A change that would put more emphasis on the sport and on the fans and not so much on the interests of moneyed fools- whether they are owners or administrators (management or labor) or corporate geeks or players. Maybe less money taken from the fans and more real sports provided to them.

I understand that individuals started pro sports. But when owners are free to do what they choose- and corporations and unions have gotten more influence- the fans have often gotten less. At a certain point the current way teams are held and administered needs to be looked at and addressed.

There is a "porn theatre" (or "theater" if you don't own a soccer team) aspect to much of the business side of sports and the life-styles it enables.

When the Modells of the world are stopped from entering the HOF- however it happened- that underlines the need for a change. And ultimately speaks to the real bottom-line.

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Posted: 3/6/2013 1:10 PM

Re: Art's Porn Theatre 



HeadHole wrote: "He went years grudgingly accepting what he had, and then when city fathers told him his turn would come, he suddenly couldn't wait another second."

-- And that- to me- is the real bottom-line. Put aside any quibbles about who did what to who. Fascinating, but it's beside the point.

Why should the Modells or the Irsays or any other owner be put in a position where they can do things as they see fit- even if it means cheap-shotting the fans or the community that has been a patron for the team? Why should any owner be independent from the community- which gives the team it's persona and provides it a marketplace- and be allowed the power to do things as they see fit? 

A fundamental change to the power structure of pro sports is overdue. A change that will have financial ramifications that may help fans even as it moderates the now deep pockets of administrators and players. A change that would put more emphasis on the sport and on the fans and not so much on the interests of moneyed fools- whether they are owners or administrators (management or labor) or corporate geeks or players. Maybe less money taken from the fans and more real sports provided to them.

I understand that individuals started pro sports. But when owners are free to do what they choose- and corporations and unions have gotten more influence- the fans have often gotten less. At a certain point the current way teams are held and administered needs to be looked at and addressed.

There is a "porn theatre" (or "theater" if you don't own a soccer team) aspect to much of the business side of sports and the life-styles it enables.

When the Modells of the world are stopped from entering the HOF- however it happened- that underlines the need for a change. And ultimately speaks to the real bottom-line.




Have no idea where you are going with this.

In spirit, I am with you. Professional franchises are civic assets. I get it.

In reality these are privately held companies and this is America. You're yelling at clouds.
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Posted: 3/6/2013 2:32 PM

Re: Art's Porn Theatre 


" You're yelling at clouds."

-- Although I don't remember all of my earlier times, I don't think I've ever yelled at clouds.

"Have no idea where you are going with this."

-- Simple. I am stating what needs to happen in the future. When that is, who knows? But a certain current situation doesn't preclude a future situation yet to happen. Just detains it. 

"In spirit, I am with you. Professional franchises are civic assets. I get it.

In reality these are privately held companies and this is America."

-- There are two POVs in your comments. Spirit and reality. I think both do exist and can't sustain a co-existence when there is a viable option. Not a simple option, but a viable one that puts communities, sports and fans above self-entitled rich guys, corporate interests and labor goons. 

As an example, look at the Packers' structure. Now imagine a structure somewhat like that for the entire NFL, but take out the influences of corporations and player unions and replace them with the influences of the common good. How this structure is managed can be determined- as long as fan and community interests are first and foremost.

Players would be given a decent salary and given a good medical plan that has clearly defined limitations from day one. The players can agree to it or seek employment elsewhere, Thanks for coming and good luck. With communities calling the shots, no need for labor unions trying to split a pie that no longer exists. As said, fans and communities come first at the trough.

The fans- or a community- would be paying for a good sport unhampered by too much corporate or union power. Go to the reasonably priced stadium to watch a good game free of moneyed fools. 

In reality, certainly not something that's going to happen very soon. But the spirit is there.

So far, I'm okay with sports as they are. But my patience for some things is challenged. I take pleasure in thinking how sports could be improved.

Seeing Modell get his deceased a** kicked yet again is icing on the cake.




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Posted: 3/6/2013 3:14 PM

Re: Art's Porn Theatre 



HeadHole wrote: " You're yelling at clouds."

-- Although I don't remember all of my earlier times, I don't think I've ever yelled at clouds.

"Have no idea where you are going with this."

-- Simple. I am stating what needs to happen in the future. When that is, who knows? But a certain current situation doesn't preclude a future situation yet to happen. Just detains it. 

"In spirit, I am with you. Professional franchises are civic assets. I get it.

In reality these are privately held companies and this is America."

-- There are two POVs in your comments. Spirit and reality. I think both do exist and can't sustain a co-existence when there is a viable option. Not a simple option, but a viable one that puts communities, sports and fans above self-entitled rich guys, corporate interests and labor goons. 

As an example, look at the Packers' structure. Now imagine a structure somewhat like that for the entire NFL, but take out the influences of corporations and player unions and replace them with the influences of the common good. How this structure is managed can be determined- as long as fan and community interests are first and foremost.

Players would be given a decent salary and given a good medical plan that has clearly defined limitations from day one. The players can agree to it or seek employment elsewhere, Thanks for coming and good luck. With communities calling the shots, no need for labor unions trying to split a pie that no longer exists. As said, fans and communities come first at the trough.

The fans- or a community- would be paying for a good sport unhampered by too much corporate or union power. Go to the reasonably priced stadium to watch a good game free of moneyed fools. 

In reality, certainly not something that's going to happen very soon. But the spirit is there.

So far, I'm okay with sports as they are. But my patience for some things is challenged. I take pleasure in thinking how sports could be improved.

Seeing Modell get his deceased a** kicked yet again is icing on the cake.







There's a reason the NFL owners have made the GB arrangement unique and no longer available. Anything other than status quo moving in the opposite direction you suggest has the potential of about nil. It'll only get worse with PPV and other sorts of things that alienate fans for revenue.

But I have never been one to stand in the way of a good, populist rant, so keep yelling at those clouds.
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Posted: 3/6/2013 6:50 PM

Re: Art's Porn Theatre 


"But I have never been one to stand in the way of a good, populist rant, so keep yelling at those clouds."

-- Actually if you choose to call things as rants or as yelling at clouds, then you are trying to verbally stand in the way. Which is okay. It means as much as my writings if you want it to.

"There's a reason the NFL owners have made the GB arrangement unique and no longer available."

-- Oh I'm sure there is a reason. The owners and their boys and the union and their boys and the corporations and their boys all have reasons to keep things more or less as they are as long as it keeps money rolling in.

"Anything other than status quo moving in the opposite direction you suggest has the potential of about nil. It'll only get worse with PPV and other sorts of things that alienate fans for revenue."

-- The status quo is another way of saying things as they now are. And there are strong interests wanting to keep a good thing going for themselves as I said above. The interesting factor in all of this is that the NFL is a public entertainment and is ostensibly legally flexible. That means it can be criticized and can be changed- or even broken up- if the fee-paying entity- the fans and the communities- make a rational and organized effort to change it.

Or they can go along with the "status quo", complain a bit and shrug their shoulders. Which is what so far we have done. 

What I'm talking about wouldn't be an adjustment or a photo-op throw-away. It would in fact be a sea-change. So it is by definition something that would require a new "status quo" and would have power and control go to new entities. In that sense, I acknowledge that it lies in the future as long as fans and communities keep forking over their own interests.

To dismiss it as a "rant" or as "yelling at the clouds" is to accept the status quo and to be a "useful fool" like I have been for the current NFL power structure. But hey, at least a product of sorts will get trotted out onto the field. 


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Posted: 3/6/2013 10:17 PM

Re: Art's Porn Theatre 


Calling it a rant wasn't meant as an insult. Wasn't my intent.

Yelling at clouds wasn't meant as a diss either. Just a way of saying you're making a point to a group that couldn't care le$$. You intent is noble.

I'll leave it all there. Cheers.
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Posted: 3/7/2013 10:35 AM

Re: Art's Porn Theatre 


"Calling it a rant wasn't meant as an insult. Wasn't my intent.

Yelling at clouds wasn't meant as a diss either."

-- Noted. Don't worry. I don't go away from this board feeling dissed or insulted. Life, as they say, is too short.

"Just a way of saying you're making a point to a group that couldn't care le$$."

-- That's a point of view that needs to change. We'll see. And I like the dollar signs. So appropriate.

"You intent is noble."

-- Well, I think of it as simple common sense. Which hopefully will get more focused as the NFL bubble grows. As it will. I take solace in the old saying: If it can't last it won't last. (Look at what happened to the old USSR).

"I'll leave it all there. Cheers."

-- Yes. Enough talk and forum exchanges. No point after awhile. Cheers.


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Posted: 3/11/2013 9:23 AM

Opiated masses 


HH:

To dismiss it as a "rant" or as "yelling at the clouds" is to accept the status quo and to be a "useful fool" like I have been for the current NFL power structure. But hey, at least a product of sorts will get trotted out onto the field.

AA:

60's flashback.  If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem.  Opiated masses. Whadya gonna do with 'em?

Agree with Nas.  Noble and all, etc. 

But where I think a sea change could happen, and COULD have happened is if Randy Lerner actually walked the walk when he talked about an owner being a STEWARD (though maybe he meant it more in the sense of "caretaker"), was to give the public a year's notice that he would be selling the franchise and announce his keen interest in selling it to a structure like Green Bay's, and then have a local grassroots organization employ some erstwhile lawyers to challenge the NFL ownership rules in court.

Otherwise, you'd need a reincarnated Hugo Chavez elected President and nationalizing the NFL. 
And as much as some would like to think Obama is that very reincarnation, he's not.

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