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History that makes you go Huh?

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Posted: 1/22/2012 1:28 AM

History that makes you go Huh? 


History is full of outrageous characters, and stories that would make Hollywood script writers roll their eyes. This is a thread to post some of the most unbelievable outlandish historical facts you know.

I'll start the thread with the story of Private Wojtek. For those who have never heard of him Private Wojtek was one of the many heroic soldiers  who served in WW2. He was a celebrated and decorated war hero, who stood out not only for his devotion, loyalty, and bravery, but also because he happened to be a bear.

From Wiki

In 1942, a local boy found a bear cub near Hamadan, Iran. He sold it to the soldiers of the Polish Army stationed nearby for a couple of canned meat tins. As the bear was less than a year old, he initially had problems swallowing and was fed with condensed milk from an emptied vodka bottle. The bear was fed with fruits, marmalade, honey and syrup, and was often rewarded with beer, which became his favorite drink. He also enjoyed smoking and eating cigarettes. He enjoyed wrestling and was taught to salute when greeted. The bear became quite an attraction for soldiers and civilians alike, and soon became an unofficial mascot of all units stationed nearby. With the company he moved to Iraq and then through Syria, Palestine and Egypt.

To get him on a British transport ship when the unit sailed from Egypt to fight with the British 8th Army in the Italian campaign, he was officially drafted into the Polish Army as a private and was listed among the soldiers of the 22nd Artillery Supply Company of the Polish II Corps. Henryk Zacharewicz and Dymitr Szawlugo were assigned as his caretakers.

As one of the officially enlisted "soldiers" of the company, he lived with the other men in their tents or in a special wooden crate, which was transported by truck. According to numerous accounts, during the Battle of Monte Cassino, Wojtek helped his friends by transporting ammunition – never dropping a single crate. In recognition of the bear's popularity, the HQ approved an effigy of a bear holding an artillery shell as the official emblem of the 22nd Company (by then renamed to 22nd Transport Company.

Following the end of World War II in 1945, the bear was transported to Berwickshire in Scotland, along with parts of the II Corps. Stationed in the village of Hutton, near Duns, Wojtek soon became popular among local civilians and the press. The Polish-Scottish Association made Wojtek one of its honorary members. Following demobilization on November 15, 1947, Wojtek was given to the Edinburgh Zoo. There Wojtek spent the rest of his days, often visited by journalists and former Polish soldiers, some of whom would toss him cigarettes, which he then proceeded to smoke. Wojtek died in December 1963, at the age of 22.



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Posted: 1/22/2012 3:41 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


The history of income tax in this country and the manner in which the concept has become so assumed & accepted in something that makes one go huh?

Not looking to start a big debate on it...and there are way to many things to link as attachments.

Just a very interesting study especially in relation to how we as people, in this free world, start accepting things as they are b/c "they always were" before we came along.
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Posted: 1/23/2012 7:26 AM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


There are a lot of things that out there that people just assume are products of modern society. However a lot of the inventions and discoveries that most people would assume are products of the modern mind have actually been around for 1000s of years. For instance.

Sushruta,The Father of Surgery,  lived in India around 800 BC and invented  many surgical procedures used to this day. Some of the more complicated surgeries include caesarian sections, rhinoplasty, cataract surgery, and the practice of "stitching the intestines by using ant-heads as stitching material." 

Or how about the flamethrower. Invented by the Byzantines, it was a hand-operated pump with a torch on the end to ignite bursts of Greek fire. The flamethrowers were mostly used in naval warfare, to set enemy ships aflame. Since Greek fire was a jelly-like substance similar to napalm, it floated in water - anybody unlucky enough to abandon their burning ship would jump into the burning sea. Talk about out of the frying pan and into the fire!

Then of course there is the Baghdad Battery.  The Baghdad Batterys are believed to be about 2,000 years old and consist of an earthenware shell, with a stopper composed of asphalt. Sticking through the top of the stopper is an iron rod. Inside the jar the rod is surrounded by a cylinder of copper. Researchers think that the batterys may have been used to electroplate gold onto silver items.
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Posted: 1/24/2012 8:49 AM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


i presume that coca wine was, indeed, an “invigorator,” though i don’t know how effective it would be at treating sleeplessness:

on this promotional paperweight, a german company boasts of being the “largest makers in the world of quinine and cocaine”:

this alcohol and opium concoction was for treating asthma:

cocaine drops for the kids:

this product, made up of 46% alcohol mixed with opium, was for all ages; on the back it includes dosages for as young as five days:

new! (feb. ’10): after seeing the post, louise sent in a recipe from her great-grandma’s cookbook. her great-grandmother was a cook at a country house in england. the recipe is dated 1891 and calls for “tincture of opium”:

The recipe from the lower half of the right-hand page (with original spellings):

Hethys recipe for cough mixture

1 pennyworth of each
Antimonial Wine
Acetic Acid
Tincture of opium
Oil of aniseed
Essence of peppermint
1/2lb best treacle

Well mix and make up to Pint with water.

"Its always easier to sell them some sh.it than it is to tell them the truth"
Baba Fats

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Posted: 1/24/2012 5:25 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


I've always loved the fact that most of those so called "cures" were being legally sold over the counter while the temperance unions were going nuts trying to ban booze. 



"Good photo shoot ladies. Now everyone have a safe trip home, and don't forget to take some heroin tonight. Its cold season you know."

BTW I don't think these fine specimens of womanhood are making a very compelling case for  a life of sobriety.

Last edited 1/24/2012 5:27 PM by BernieBrown

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Posted: 1/24/2012 8:31 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


There was an older rapture-like movement that took root in Ohio.  The parallels with Harold Camping are interesting.

http://www.ohiohistorycentral....try.php?rec=607

The Millerites:

Millerites were disciples of William Miller.  Miller, a farmer from New York, claimed to have discovered when Jesus Christ would return to Earth as stated in the Bible.  Miller reached this belief in the 1820s but did not begin to share it with other people until the 1830s.  By the early 1840s, approximately one million people had attended camp meetings and heard Miller's message.  Perhaps ten percent of those people actually believed Miller.

Miller predicted that Christ's second coming would occur in April 1843 and that all worthy people would ascend to heaven on October 23, 1844.  Thousands of people across the United States, including in Ohio, eagerly anticipated the event.  Numerous people forsook their original religious beliefs and adopted Millerism, hoping that Jesus Christ would find no fault with them upon his return to Earth.  Millerites consisted of all types of people.  Many working-class people hoped that Christ's arrival would end their laborious lives.  Other Americans believed that many people were sinners and that only the true believers, the Millerites, would escape punishment.  God wanted the deserving to assist their unworthy neighbors through various reform movements, such as the temperance and abolition movements.  Other people believed that citizens of the United States were God's chosen people and that Jesus Christ's arrival would prove this point.

As October 23, 1844 approached, many Millerites sold all of their earthly possessions.  Many sources claim that the Millerites, dressed in white robes, climbed the highest mountains and hills that they could find so that they would be closer to heaven.  Unfortunately for these people, they did not ascend to heaven on the appointed day.  Miller claimed to have made an error and quickly issued a new date for the second coming, approximately six months later.  Once again, this day came and went.  In most cases, Miller's followers abandoned him.  In 1845, some of Miller's followers joined the Adventist Church, which Miller helped establish.  Adventists believe in the second coming of Christ, but they do not specify a day when this event will occur.


http://cincinnati.com/blogs/ou...disappointment/

Millerites’ 1844 ‘rapture’ event called the Great Disappointment


Thousands of Cincinnatians camped out in 1844 to witness what they believed was going to be the world’s greatest – and final – fireworks display.

They weren’t celebrating the Fourth of July. They were waiting for the end of the world.

These happy campers were the followers of a 19th-century version of the Rev. Harold Camping, the Rapture predictor.

The views of the Rapture reverend, broadcast over his multi-million-dollar radio, TV, satellite and website empire, would move those Cincinnatians to say: Been there. Done that.

They knew what it was like to fall under the spell of a well-heeled, charismatic preacher. As with Camping, their hells fire and brimstone pastor – the Rev. William Miller – used the latest mass media to gain worldwide attention for his prediction that the world was going to come to an end.

Before the end came, predicted Miller, Jesus Christ would return. He would be accompanied by the sound of trumpets and in the company of winged steeds pulling chariots. At the stroke of midnight, all of the preacher’s true believers would ascend to heaven.  After that, the world turn be consumed by a giant fireball.  The End.

Cue the fireworks.

The only trouble was, they’re weren’t any fireworks. Not even a spark.

Worldwide campaign

Miller had started peddling his prediction – based on a series of elaborate charts – in the 1820s. By the 1840s, the War of 1812 veteran was spreading the word world-wide.

“What happened this May with Harold Camping,” noted Rhys Williams, Sociology Department chairman at Loyola University Chicago, “was small potatoes compared to what went on with William Miller in 1844.”

Estimated to be 500,000 strong, Miller’s believers carried out his game plan.  He used the social networking of his day, speeches, sermons, billboards, posters, tent meetings, books, newsletters and newspapers, to deliver his message.  Millerites by the thousands lived in Cincinnati.

On the morning of the appointed day – Oct. 22, 1844 – 2,000 Millerites trekked from downtown Cincinnati. Another 2,500 Millerites stayed behind to pack a temporary tabernacle near where Centennial Plaza stands today in City Hall’s shadow.

The tabernacle, naturally, was not made to last. The world was going to come to an end, the Millerites reasoned.  No sense putting up something permanent.

The 2,000 faithful followed the path of what is now Central Parkway. At Ravine Street, the Millerites turned right to climb the steep hill.

Near the summit, they stopped at the site of present-day Fairview Park.  Known then and now for its scenic overlooks, the greenspace gave them what they thought would be their last look at a bustling Cincinnati, on the verge of becoming the sixth largest city in America.

Some were dressed for the occasion.  They wore white ascension robes designed to climb that stairway to heaven.

The Enquirer, then in its third year of existence, reported that some Millerites had quit their jobs.  Many got rid of their possessions.  They felt the end was near.

At the overlook, some of the chosen ones plopped into adjoining wash tubs, a la the side-by-side bathtubs in the modern-day Cialis ads.  Some prayed.  Some partied.

They waited for the end.  And for Jesus.

Neither arrived.  So, Oct. 22, 1844, came to be known as the Great Disappointment.

At dawn, the Millerites retraced their route.  Along the way, they were openly ridiculed.  The Enquirer called them “deluded fanatics of this most ridiculous humbug.”

Miller – based in upstate New York – said: Whoops!  My bad.  Faulty calculations.  (Camping used the same excuse when his Rapture failed to materialize.)

Follower picked date

To be fair, Miller never picked an exact date for his rapture.  He hedged his bets by citing a range of dates.  A follower selected Oct. 22, 1844.  And, Miller didn’t object.

Miller – as Camping would 167 years later – became a punchline.  Then, as now, the question was asked:  Why do people believe this stuff?

“The 1840s were a time of great economic instability, high immigration – people were mad about immigrants taking their jobs – and tumult in religion,” said Williams, a former University of Cincinnati professor whose work examines how politics, religion and social movements effect American culture.

“Couple that unsettled world,” he added, “with a milieu where people were just influenced by their social circle and the belief in supernatural events does not seem that far-fetched.”

Williams paused before adding: “Those conditions sound a lot like today.”

Then as now, Americans dealt with these “repent, the end is near” movements with a sense of humor.

As the Great Disappointment dawned near Boston, a trumpet could be heard.  The faithful cried: “Hallelujah!”

That was no angel blowing his horn.  It was a prankster.

After his second blast on the horn, he called out:

“Go back to your work.  Gabriel ain’t a-coming.”

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Last edited 1/24/2012 8:32 PM by T-Dog

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Posted: 1/25/2012 4:19 AM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


The Shakers are another great whacked out religious sect. 

They got their name from a combination of  shaking and Quakers because of the ecstatic nature of their worship services. Started in 1747, they were one of the few movements that looked to women for leadership. Ann Lee was one of their early leaders. Devastated by the loss of four children in infancy she claimed that God came to her and told her that people needed to give up their worldly goods and take up the cross of celibacy. Basically if you wanted to join the Shakers no more sex for you. 


Shakers lived in communes and developed written covenants with their members. Those who signed the covenant had to confess their sins, consecrate their property and their labor to the society, and live celibate. If they were married before joining the society, their marriages essentially ended when they joined. A few less-committed Believers lived in "noncommunal orders" as Shaker sympathizers who preferred to remain with their families. The Shakers never forbade marriage for such individuals, but considered it less perfect than the celibate state. Unsurprisingly  Turnover was really high with many people leaving the religion especially young people. The group reached maximum size of about 6,000 full members in 1840, but as of 2009 only three members are left. 

The Shakers are mostly known today for their amazing craftsmanship in wood working, quilting and other handy crafts. If you find any genuine Shaker furniture it can fetch quite a good price at auction. Really its no wonder they were so good at things like wood working and knitting. I can just see the men in their workshops  lathing and repressing, carving and repressing, sanding and repressing. Honestly I have no idea how they lasted as long as they did.

Last edited 1/25/2012 7:25 AM by BernieBrown

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Posted: 1/25/2012 12:50 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 



BernieBrown wrote: I've always loved the fact that most of those so called "cures" were being legally sold over the counter while the temperance unions were going nuts trying to ban booze. 



"Good photo shoot ladies. Now everyone have a safe trip home, and don't forget to take some heroin tonight. Its cold season you know."

BTW I don't think these fine specimens of womanhood are making a very compelling case for  a life of sobriety.
That pic may have been taken in Westerville. Honest. That was a big place in the early temperance movements.
 
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Posted: 1/26/2012 2:48 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


John Tyler was born in 1790, and he was the 10th president of the United States in 1841. Believe it or not, he has two living grandchildren. For perspective consider this: When Tyler was born, George Washington was giving his State of the Union address. When Tyler became president, the civil war was still 20 years away! But how is this possible? Here's some math for you: Tyler had 15 children, and in 1853 he was 63 when his son Lyon Gardiner Tyler was born. Lyon had six children, with two of them, Harrison Ruffin Tyler and Lyon Gardiner Tyler Jr., born when he was in his 70s in 1924 and 1928 respectively. Both men, now in their 80s, still live in Virginia.


via RCLink

Saddle up boys, lock and load.

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Posted: 1/27/2012 11:37 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 



37179 wrote: John Tyler was born in 1790, and he was the 10th president of the United States in 1841. Believe it or not, he has two living grandchildren. For perspective consider this: When Tyler was born, George Washington was giving his State of the Union address. When Tyler became president, the civil war was still 20 years away! But how is this possible? Here's some math for you: Tyler had 15 children, and in 1853 he was 63 when his son Lyon Gardiner Tyler was born. Lyon had six children, with two of them, Harrison Ruffin Tyler and Lyon Gardiner Tyler Jr., born when he was in his 70s in 1924 and 1928 respectively. Both men, now in their 80s, still live in Virginia.


via RCLink
Things like this really make you realize just how young the USA is. Its strange to think about the fact that my mother was alive at the same time as a few civil was veterans. And that my great grandfather, a man who I was pictured with as a baby was born and grew up next to a farm owned by a veteran of the war of 1812.
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Posted: 1/28/2012 6:17 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


In the middle ages it wasn't uncommon for animals to be tried, and convicted of crimes just like their human counter parts. Often times the animal in question was dressed up in human clothing for the trial and sentencing. 

In 1547 a sow and her piglets were put on trial in Normandy for eating a child. The sow was found guilty and hanged, but the piglets were spared because of their youth and the bad example set by their mother. 

In Stelvio Italy in 1519 moles were accused of damaging crops by burrowing so that nothing could grow. They were required to show cause for their conduct by pleading their exigencies and distress. Unsurprisingly the moles did not show up to court when summoned, but the judge went ahead and sentenced them in their absence. Being a merciful judge he decided that exile would be the best course of action and promised the moles safe conduct and a respite of 14 days to all those moles with young.

Bartholomew Chassenee a French Lawyer made a reputation with his skillful defense of animals. In one case rats had destroyed a barley crop. When his clients failed to appear before the court, he argued that the summons was invalid since it should have been served to all of the rats in the district. When a new summons was made he argued that evilly disposed cats belonging to the prosecutors were intimidating his clients. He demanded a cash guarantee that the cats would not attack the rats on their way to court. The prosecution refused, and the case was dismissed.

Animals were also used as executioners.   Many times in Halifax if the person to be executed was well liked or if there was doubt about guilt a cow would be tied to the Gibblet's lever and rigged so that when the cow wondered far enough it would pull the lever and execute the condemned. Supposedly this method kept the executed persons blood off of the hands of the townsfolk, judge, and executioner.
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Posted: 1/30/2012 11:14 AM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


The Dancing Plague of 1518 began in July 1518, when a woman, Frau Troffea, began to dance fervently in a street in Strasbourg. Within a week, 34 others had joined, and within a month, there were around 400 dancers. Some of these people eventually died from heart attack, stroke, or exhaustion. 

As the dancing plague worsened, concerned nobles sought the advice of local physicians, who ruled out astrological and supernatural causes, instead announcing that the plague was a "natural disease" caused by "hot blood."  However, instead of prescribing bleeding, authorities encouraged more dancing, in part by opening two guildhalls and a grain market, and even constructing a wooden stage. The authorities did this because they believed that the dancers would only recover if they danced continuously night and day. To increase the effectiveness of the cure, authorities even paid for musicians to keep the afflicted moving. It is not known why so many people randomly danced to their deaths.
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Posted: 1/30/2012 11:47 AM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


While cocaine and opiates were a part of the history of "patent medicine", there was also the radioactive era.

http://urbantitan.com/8-weirde...-actually-used/

1. Radium Toothpaste








4. Radium Suppositories




8. Radioactive Medicine






http://medgadget.com/the_good_old_days/page/2

revigator The Real Health Risks of Irradiated Products from a Bygone Era

Shortly after the discovery of radioactivity, quick thinking entrepreneurs and contemporary holistic medicine men began selling products containing the all-natural property. Claims regarding radiation’s health benefits were endless, until folks like Marie Curie proved them otherwise. (Madame Curie and her husband were well known for entertaining their guests at home parties with glowing flasks filled with radium, according to a terrific book by Richard Rhodes, The Making of the Atomic Bomb.) But in the meantime, untold numbers of people from all walks of life have brushed their teeth with radioactive toothpaste and drank from infusion devices like the Revigator.


http://www.orau.org/ptp/articl.../quackstory.htm

The solution came with the invention of devices that could be used in the home to add radon to drinking water. In this country, the first and most popular was the Revigator, based on a patent taken out in 1912. Although its inventor, R.W. Thomas, was not related to Thomas Edison, he was claimed to be of equal genius, at least in the sales brochures of the Revigator Company. This company, headquartered in San Francisco, was large enough to maintain numerous branch offices across the country. Revigator sales reached several hundred thousand, a remarkable record in view of its relatively high price, $29.50 (in 1929).

The Revigator itself was a "radioactive water crock."  A jar made of radium-containing ore, it held several gallons of water, came with its own spigot, and had the following instructions on the side:  "Fill jar every night. Drink freely . . . when thirsty and upon arising and retiring, average six or more glasses daily." The radon produced by the radium in the ore would dissolve overnight in the water. In effect, it served as a "perpetual health spring in the home."

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Last edited 2/1/2012 5:34 PM by T-Dog

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Posted: 2/1/2012 5:30 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


Speaking of folks using radium. Eben Byers was a famous American socialite who swore by the health benefits of Radithor which was little more than radium infused water.  He drank three bottles a day until his jaw fell off only then did he realize he had made a mistake. At that point it was too late and he ended up dying a pretty gruesome death. They even had to bury him in a lead lined coffin. Unsurprisingly he was from Pittsburgh.

Along the same lines here is an ad from the 50s that involves women rubbing radio active dirt on their face.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBoD_zRfz_4
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Posted: 2/4/2012 2:39 AM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


The Story Of Michael Malloy

In New York in 1933, five guys devise a get-rich-quick scheme, where they would take out three life insurance policies on a homeless drunk, and then get him to drink himself to death. They settled on Mickey Malloy. One of the conspirators owned a speakeasy, and gave Mickey unlimited credit, assuming the drunk would simply drink and drink until he died. He did drink and drink and drink and drink, but he didn't die. So the conspirators started serving him antifreeze. Mickey didn't notice, or didn't care, but he'd drink antifreeze all day, pass out, not die, and wake up and ask for more.

So they started serving him turpentine, which didn't work, neither did horse liniment or even rat poison. They served him a banquet of raw oysters soaked in pure ethanol, again, Mickey enjoyed their hospitality without any ill effects. So they served him a delicious sandwich, made with spoiled sardines and carpet tacks. But he just ate it and thanked them. Frustrated with Mickey's unhuman resistance to poison and metal, the conspirators resorted to more direct measures. They waited until Mickey passed out from his usual all-night binge on turpentine and rat poison cocktails, drug him out into a frigid New York night, threw him in snow drift, stripped him naked and poured a bucket of water on him. 

However Mickey showed up in the bar the next day, thirsty for more horse liniment. So they hit him with a car. This put him in the hospital, but he survived. Fed up, the five men got him passed-out drunk again, took him to his room, stuck a gas jet hose in his mouth, and successfully suffocated him. Mickey was pronounced dead from pneumonia, and the five guys would've gotten away with it, but they talked too much and ended up all being convicted of Mickey's murder.




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Posted: 2/4/2012 9:04 AM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


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Posted: 2/6/2012 12:32 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


Mozart really loved poop jokes.

A canon written in 1782 was attributed for a long time to Mozart. This wouldn't be anything out of the ordinary, but the title of it is Leck mich im Arsch, which translates to Lick me in the rear end, or Kiss my rear end. Recent evidence suggests that the Austrian physician Wenzel Trnka wrote the original music and lyrics, with Mozart writing new lyrics for his friends at parties.

After he died his widow sent the music and Mozart's lyrics to music publishers, who wouldn't publish it under that name or with the lyrics. It was instead published under the title Laßt froh uns sein (Let us be glad).

The original lyrics were rediscovered in 1991, consisting of these lines over and over:


g'schwindiLeck mich, leck mich,Leck im A... mich g'schwindi.Leck mich im A... g'schwindi, g'schwindi!
Which translates to

Quickly.Kiss me, kiss me,Kiss in the rear end me quickly.Kiss my rear end quickly, quickly!

 

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Posted: 2/8/2012 8:07 AM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


The Man Who Ate The Heart Of A King

There are great men among great men (Plato, Galileo, Einstein…)  and great eccentrics among great eccentrics. For this second exclusive club Beachcombing’s candidates would include the charming and irrepressible William Buckland (obit 1856), Victorian geologist and zoophagist and, towards the end of his life, inmate in a mental asylum.

Buckland – unlike his more mannered son, Francis – was completely unconscious of just how bizarre he was: perhaps the first condition for the true eccentric. There is, for example, a lovely story of a visit that he and some colleagues took to St Paul’s Cathedral where they found a strange stain on the stone floor. The visitors speculated on what this strange mark could be – there was a claim that the mark was a saint’s blood, while WB got straight to the nub of the problem. Getting onto his hands and knees like a dog, he licked the substance and announced to the amazed host ‘bat urine!’

As this story suggests Buckland lacked the normal concerns about what we put and what we do not put in our mouth. Indeed, he expressed an ambition to eat every living thing. And our records inform us that repasts on bluebottles and toasted mice, panthers and puppies were routine. But no meal that Buckland enjoyed was so extraordinary as the one that the raconteur Augustus Hare (obit 1903) described, a meal that Beachcombing has chosen to include in his Immortal Meals series.

On this particular occasion WB was eating at the country house at Nuneham Park when the table was shown the heart of Louis XIV (obit 1715), ‘the Sun King’ in a silver container. Without missing a beat and with that wonderful spontaneity that characterised him Buckland announced ‘I have eaten many strange things, but have never eaten the heart of a king before’. And, before any of the assembled host could stop him, the heart of Louis XIV passed down the great geologist’s throat.

http://www.strangehistory.net/...ch-kings-heart/
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Posted: 1/21/2013 7:39 PM

Re: History that makes you go Huh? 


The Finnish army also received drugs from the Germans during WW2, namely methamphetamine in the form of tablets labled as Pervitin. It was mainly given to long-range patrol units to be used in situations where extreme effort/exertion was needed. For example when moving on skis they could be given to the man who was opening the trail and therefore needed some extra boost. Giving tablets to all patrol members at the same time was discouraged, as it tended to cause the careful single-line advance to devolve into hopped-up dudes racing side-by-side, all of them blazing their own trails.

The soldiers didn't always know what kind of substance they were dealing with, as exemplified by the story of long range patrol member Aimo Koivunen. His patrol was ambushed by the Soviets in Lapland, but managed to slip away from the firefight. The Soviets began to chase the patrol, and soon Koivunen, who was leading the retreat and opening the trail, felt his strength slipping away. He then remembered that he had the whole patrol's Pervitin rations in his breast pocket, and reached for one tablet. Because he was in a hurry and wearing thick gloves he instead grabbed thirty tablets, but decided to shove them in his mouth regardless. Sure enough he soon felt energized and began opening the trail with a whole new zeal, but then things got a bit blurry.

The next clear memory he has is from the next day, when he realizes that he's alone, without ammo or food, something like 100 kilometers away from where he last remembered being. During the next two weeks or so he skis roughly 400 kilometers in -20 celsius weather, avoids Soviet partisans, lives on pine seedlings (and one bird, eaten raw), is wounded from a mine, and spends a week in a hole in the snow, waiting for help. When he's finally rescued and transported to a hospital, he weighs 43 kilograms and his heart rate is close to 200. His story is one of the more legendary ones among the Finnish long range patrol circles, and also the first documented case of methamphetamine overdose in Finland.
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