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Re: Bowl games locations... wake up

Avatar

Posted: 12/6/2012 9:01 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


Yeah right.  AU couldn't drive any demand for tickets to the BCSNC game......none at all.....

Do you people ever leave your echo chamber?  How does it feel living in a bubble?

***********************************************

How hot a ticket is Monday's BCS Championship showdown between Auburn and Oregon? As of Wednesday evening, hot enough not only to frustrate the efforts of the kind of people who aren't used to making one to see a football game, but also to effectively break the big online ticket brokers: BothStubHub and TicketCity have actually stopped sales for the game due to a run on tickets that even the Super Bowl can't command.

"As a result of the high demand and scarcity of BCS National Championship Game tickets, we have been unable to fulfill some customers' orders," a StubHub spokesman said in a statement released Wednesday night. "Unfortunately, one of our larger sellers for this event could not secure enough tickets to fulfill all of their confirmed sales, which has caused a trickle-down effect." Needless to say, if you bought your ticket months ago, that effect could bring you quite a nice return on that investment this week.

Prior to shutting down sales, BCS Championship tickets on StubHub were starting at more than $3,880 on Wednesday afternoon, and climbing as high as $15,995 for a seat on the 50-yard line. The average ticket for the game had gone for slightly more than $1,100, making it the top-selling event in the history of the site. "Right now, it's unprecedented," Dan Rubendall, CEO of online ticket broker Zigabid.com, told the Portland Oregonian. "It's absolutely the craziest scene we've ever seen. I mean, this is bigger than any Super Bowl we've seen in 20 years."



******************************************
 

BCS title game a big ticket for Auburn fans



Auburn fans who don't donate to athletics may find tickets to the BCS national championship game tough to come by, but at least finding an airline ticket is a bit easier today.
Delta has added 4,500 seats to big-time bowl destinations, including five additional flights with 1,300 seats from Birmingham to Phoenix for the Jan. 10 championship game. Delta added two flights each on Jan. 7 and 8, and three return flights from Phoenix on the 11th, including two get-out-town-quick flights, one leaving at 1 a.m. and the other leaving at 2 a.m. You can be at work the next day. Delta added flights from Portland and Eugene for Oregon fans as well.
The game will be played in 73,000-seat University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.
Auburn received 17,000 tickets. Students were allotted 1,500 of those.
If you can't get a ticket through Auburn, you could try eBay. The highest priced ticket? $97,750. But shipping is free! Random spot check: Four together are $4,000. Two tickets listed as Auburn "donor" tickets are $1,999. That's for the pair.
StubHub has one in a suite for $70,590. StubHub lists tickets prices from about $700  to $100,003. Tickets from any place other than Auburn and Oregon figure to be pricey.Travel packages from Alabama are going for as much as $3,795.
Auburn is selling the tickets for $300 and $325, but only people on high end of the university's ticket scale have a real shot at getting them (along with faculty and students). 
First in line will be suite holders, scholarship donors and Beckwith Club members. Then it's Tigers Unlimited members, faculty and staff and students. The deadline for ordering is rapidly approaching. The fact Auburn has done little to promote its ticket sales tells you the tickets are a hot commodity. Here's the ticket information from Auburn. 




UGABuck wrote:
trurebel wrote: You put the SEC 1st place team vs. the SEC 6th place team and it is  a sellout.

Alabama vs. South Carolina......easy sellout.

Hell, you put the SEC 5th place vs. the SEC 6th place and it is a sellout.

LSU vs. South Carolina.....easy sellout.

You coulda put UT and AU in Atlanta and drew more than 40K......even this year.

lol
RidgeRoadRattler wrote:

---------------------------------------------
--- AceTommyBoy wrote:

The Big Ten conference championship game only had 40,000. No one wants to travel to watch a game in the north.

Seriously, who cares where the games are played? The Big Ten doesn't lose bowl games because of location, they lose because of inferior coaches and players.

---------------------------------------------

The Big Ten Championship game featured a 6th place team! Who wants to watch that?
I suppose where you are from math doesn't work well. Auburn couldn't sell their allotment of tickets for their BCSNCG. Now, don't get too embarrassed, it happens to schools like OSU that go to BCS games quite often.

However, think about this. Little ole SEC school Auburn that hasn't played in a BCS Championship Game or BCS games that I recall, couldn't get enough fans to travel all the way to Arizona? I guess those trailers aren't as portable as you think. wink
Real Eyes
Realize 
Real Lies


Last edited 12/6/2012 9:18 AM by trurebel

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Avatar

Posted: 12/6/2012 9:32 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


People need to realize that Bowl games are essentially an exhibition that is sponsored by the local tourism board. The goal is raise money for the region. That is why so much money is spent on "recruiting" and paying/entertaining as many people with influence to have a team/conference attend your city. If a Midwest/Northern city wanted a bowl game, they need to determine is the location a sufficient "winter" attraction for tourists and want to spend money on promoting the location/event.
Reply | Quote

Posted: 12/6/2012 10:33 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 



trurebel wrote: Yeah right.  AU couldn't drive any demand for tickets to the BCSNC game......none at all.....

Do you people ever leave your echo chamber?  How does it feel living in a bubble?

***********************************************

How hot a ticket is Monday's BCS Championship showdown between Auburn and Oregon? As of Wednesday evening, hot enough not only to frustrate the efforts of the kind of people who aren't used to making one to see a football game, but also to effectively break the big online ticket brokers: BothStubHub and TicketCity have actually stopped sales for the game due to a run on tickets that even the Super Bowl can't command.

"As a result of the high demand and scarcity of BCS National Championship Game tickets, we have been unable to fulfill some customers' orders," a StubHub spokesman said in a statement released Wednesday night. "Unfortunately, one of our larger sellers for this event could not secure enough tickets to fulfill all of their confirmed sales, which has caused a trickle-down effect." Needless to say, if you bought your ticket months ago, that effect could bring you quite a nice return on that investment this week.

Prior to shutting down sales, BCS Championship tickets on StubHub were starting at more than $3,880 on Wednesday afternoon, and climbing as high as $15,995 for a seat on the 50-yard line. The average ticket for the game had gone for slightly more than $1,100, making it the top-selling event in the history of the site. "Right now, it's unprecedented," Dan Rubendall, CEO of online ticket broker Zigabid.com, told the Portland Oregonian. "It's absolutely the craziest scene we've ever seen. I mean, this is bigger than any Super Bowl we've seen in 20 years."



******************************************
 

BCS title game a big ticket for Auburn fans



Auburn fans who don't donate to athletics may find tickets to the BCS national championship game tough to come by, but at least finding an airline ticket is a bit easier today.
Delta has added 4,500 seats to big-time bowl destinations, including five additional flights with 1,300 seats from Birmingham to Phoenix for the Jan. 10 championship game. Delta added two flights each on Jan. 7 and 8, and three return flights from Phoenix on the 11th, including two get-out-town-quick flights, one leaving at 1 a.m. and the other leaving at 2 a.m. You can be at work the next day. Delta added flights from Portland and Eugene for Oregon fans as well.
The game will be played in 73,000-seat University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.
Auburn received 17,000 tickets. Students were allotted 1,500 of those.
If you can't get a ticket through Auburn, you could try eBay. The highest priced ticket? $97,750. But shipping is free! Random spot check: Four together are $4,000. Two tickets listed as Auburn "donor" tickets are $1,999. That's for the pair.
StubHub has one in a suite for $70,590. StubHub lists tickets prices from about $700  to $100,003. Tickets from any place other than Auburn and Oregon figure to be pricey.Travel packages from Alabama are going for as much as $3,795.
Auburn is selling the tickets for $300 and $325, but only people on high end of the university's ticket scale have a real shot at getting them (along with faculty and students). 
First in line will be suite holders, scholarship donors and Beckwith Club members. Then it's Tigers Unlimited members, faculty and staff and students. The deadline for ordering is rapidly approaching. The fact Auburn has done little to promote its ticket sales tells you the tickets are a hot commodity. Here's the ticket information from Auburn. 




UGABuck wrote:
trurebel wrote: You put the SEC 1st place team vs. the SEC 6th place team and it is  a sellout.

Alabama vs. South Carolina......easy sellout.

Hell, you put the SEC 5th place vs. the SEC 6th place and it is a sellout.

LSU vs. South Carolina.....easy sellout.

You coulda put UT and AU in Atlanta and drew more than 40K......even this year.

lol
RidgeRoadRattler wrote:

---------------------------------------------
--- AceTommyBoy wrote:

The Big Ten conference championship game only had 40,000. No one wants to travel to watch a game in the north.

Seriously, who cares where the games are played? The Big Ten doesn't lose bowl games because of location, they lose because of inferior coaches and players.

---------------------------------------------

The Big Ten Championship game featured a 6th place team! Who wants to watch that?
I suppose where you are from math doesn't work well. Auburn couldn't sell their allotment of tickets for their BCSNCG. Now, don't get too embarrassed, it happens to schools like OSU that go to BCS games quite often.

However, think about this. Little ole SEC school Auburn that hasn't played in a BCS Championship Game or BCS games that I recall, couldn't get enough fans to travel all the way to Arizona? I guess those trailers aren't as portable as you think. wink
Whatever dude:

http://www.al.com/sports/index...g_more_tha.html

_____________________________________________
Michigan is French for "I quit!"

Reply | Quote
Avatar

Posted: 12/6/2012 10:43 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


Move the goal posts much?

Auburn sold out her allotment of tickets.  Anybody saying otherwise is either clueless or a liar.

Have another article on how obsessive Auburn fans made their BCS game's ticket costs unprecedented.  Yeah.....but they didn't take anybody.....

You post an article about how much money they spent traveling to the bowl that never references how many tickets AU sold at all or that the game struggled to sell tickets......or anything of the sort.

You can't support your claim because you made it up out of thin air.......

Read another one and learn something.....

"There are no tickets to be had anywhere."

"The demand from Auburn fans, seeking their first national title since 1957, and to a lesser extent Oregon fans, seeking their first national title ever, was too much."


http://www.aolnews.com/2011/01...e-in-us-sports/
UGABuck wrote:
trurebel wrote: Yeah right.  AU couldn't drive any demand for tickets to the BCSNC game......none at all.....

Do you people ever leave your echo chamber?  How does it feel living in a bubble?

***********************************************

How hot a ticket is Monday's BCS Championship showdown between Auburn and Oregon? As of Wednesday evening, hot enough not only to frustrate the efforts of the kind of people who aren't used to making one to see a football game, but also to effectively break the big online ticket brokers: BothStubHub and TicketCity have actually stopped sales for the game due to a run on tickets that even the Super Bowl can't command.

"As a result of the high demand and scarcity of BCS National Championship Game tickets, we have been unable to fulfill some customers' orders," a StubHub spokesman said in a statement released Wednesday night. "Unfortunately, one of our larger sellers for this event could not secure enough tickets to fulfill all of their confirmed sales, which has caused a trickle-down effect." Needless to say, if you bought your ticket months ago, that effect could bring you quite a nice return on that investment this week.

Prior to shutting down sales, BCS Championship tickets on StubHub were starting at more than $3,880 on Wednesday afternoon, and climbing as high as $15,995 for a seat on the 50-yard line. The average ticket for the game had gone for slightly more than $1,100, making it the top-selling event in the history of the site. "Right now, it's unprecedented," Dan Rubendall, CEO of online ticket broker Zigabid.com, told the Portland Oregonian. "It's absolutely the craziest scene we've ever seen. I mean, this is bigger than any Super Bowl we've seen in 20 years."



******************************************
 

BCS title game a big ticket for Auburn fans



Auburn fans who don't donate to athletics may find tickets to the BCS national championship game tough to come by, but at least finding an airline ticket is a bit easier today.
Delta has added 4,500 seats to big-time bowl destinations, including five additional flights with 1,300 seats from Birmingham to Phoenix for the Jan. 10 championship game. Delta added two flights each on Jan. 7 and 8, and three return flights from Phoenix on the 11th, including two get-out-town-quick flights, one leaving at 1 a.m. and the other leaving at 2 a.m. You can be at work the next day. Delta added flights from Portland and Eugene for Oregon fans as well.
The game will be played in 73,000-seat University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.
Auburn received 17,000 tickets. Students were allotted 1,500 of those.
If you can't get a ticket through Auburn, you could try eBay. The highest priced ticket? $97,750. But shipping is free! Random spot check: Four together are $4,000. Two tickets listed as Auburn "donor" tickets are $1,999. That's for the pair.
StubHub has one in a suite for $70,590. StubHub lists tickets prices from about $700  to $100,003. Tickets from any place other than Auburn and Oregon figure to be pricey.Travel packages from Alabama are going for as much as $3,795.
Auburn is selling the tickets for $300 and $325, but only people on high end of the university's ticket scale have a real shot at getting them (along with faculty and students). 
First in line will be suite holders, scholarship donors and Beckwith Club members. Then it's Tigers Unlimited members, faculty and staff and students. The deadline for ordering is rapidly approaching. The fact Auburn has done little to promote its ticket sales tells you the tickets are a hot commodity. Here's the ticket information from Auburn. 




UGABuck wrote:
trurebel wrote: You put the SEC 1st place team vs. the SEC 6th place team and it is  a sellout.

Alabama vs. South Carolina......easy sellout.

Hell, you put the SEC 5th place vs. the SEC 6th place and it is a sellout.

LSU vs. South Carolina.....easy sellout.

You coulda put UT and AU in Atlanta and drew more than 40K......even this year.

lol
RidgeRoadRattler wrote:

---------------------------------------------
--- AceTommyBoy wrote:

The Big Ten conference championship game only had 40,000. No one wants to travel to watch a game in the north.

Seriously, who cares where the games are played? The Big Ten doesn't lose bowl games because of location, they lose because of inferior coaches and players.

---------------------------------------------

The Big Ten Championship game featured a 6th place team! Who wants to watch that?
I suppose where you are from math doesn't work well. Auburn couldn't sell their allotment of tickets for their BCSNCG. Now, don't get too embarrassed, it happens to schools like OSU that go to BCS games quite often.

However, think about this. Little ole SEC school Auburn that hasn't played in a BCS Championship Game or BCS games that I recall, couldn't get enough fans to travel all the way to Arizona? I guess those trailers aren't as portable as you think. wink
Whatever dude:

http://www.al.com/sports/index...g_more_tha.html
Real Eyes
Realize 
Real Lies


Last edited 12/6/2012 10:47 AM by trurebel

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Posted: 12/6/2012 11:00 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 



trurebel wrote: Move the goal posts much?

Auburn sold out her allotment of tickets.  Anybody saying otherwise is either clueless or a liar.

Have another article on how obsessive Auburn fans made their BCS game's ticket costs unprecedented.  Yeah.....but they didn't take anybody.....

You post an article about how much money they spent traveling to the bowl that never references how many tickets AU sold at all or that the game struggled to sell tickets......or anything of the sort.

You can't support your claim because you made it up out of thin air.......

Read another one and learn something.....

"There are no tickets to be had anywhere."

"The demand from Auburn fans, seeking their first national title since 1957, and to a lesser extent Oregon fans, seeking their first national title ever, was too much."


http://www.aolnews.com/2011/01...e-in-us-sports/
UGABuck wrote:
trurebel wrote: Yeah right.  AU couldn't drive any demand for tickets to the BCSNC game......none at all.....

Do you people ever leave your echo chamber?  How does it feel living in a bubble?

***********************************************

How hot a ticket is Monday's BCS Championship showdown between Auburn and Oregon? As of Wednesday evening, hot enough not only to frustrate the efforts of the kind of people who aren't used to making one to see a football game, but also to effectively break the big online ticket brokers: BothStubHub and TicketCity have actually stopped sales for the game due to a run on tickets that even the Super Bowl can't command.

"As a result of the high demand and scarcity of BCS National Championship Game tickets, we have been unable to fulfill some customers' orders," a StubHub spokesman said in a statement released Wednesday night. "Unfortunately, one of our larger sellers for this event could not secure enough tickets to fulfill all of their confirmed sales, which has caused a trickle-down effect." Needless to say, if you bought your ticket months ago, that effect could bring you quite a nice return on that investment this week.

Prior to shutting down sales, BCS Championship tickets on StubHub were starting at more than $3,880 on Wednesday afternoon, and climbing as high as $15,995 for a seat on the 50-yard line. The average ticket for the game had gone for slightly more than $1,100, making it the top-selling event in the history of the site. "Right now, it's unprecedented," Dan Rubendall, CEO of online ticket broker Zigabid.com, told the Portland Oregonian. "It's absolutely the craziest scene we've ever seen. I mean, this is bigger than any Super Bowl we've seen in 20 years."



******************************************
 

BCS title game a big ticket for Auburn fans



Auburn fans who don't donate to athletics may find tickets to the BCS national championship game tough to come by, but at least finding an airline ticket is a bit easier today.
Delta has added 4,500 seats to big-time bowl destinations, including five additional flights with 1,300 seats from Birmingham to Phoenix for the Jan. 10 championship game. Delta added two flights each on Jan. 7 and 8, and three return flights from Phoenix on the 11th, including two get-out-town-quick flights, one leaving at 1 a.m. and the other leaving at 2 a.m. You can be at work the next day. Delta added flights from Portland and Eugene for Oregon fans as well.
The game will be played in 73,000-seat University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.
Auburn received 17,000 tickets. Students were allotted 1,500 of those.
If you can't get a ticket through Auburn, you could try eBay. The highest priced ticket? $97,750. But shipping is free! Random spot check: Four together are $4,000. Two tickets listed as Auburn "donor" tickets are $1,999. That's for the pair.
StubHub has one in a suite for $70,590. StubHub lists tickets prices from about $700  to $100,003. Tickets from any place other than Auburn and Oregon figure to be pricey.Travel packages from Alabama are going for as much as $3,795.
Auburn is selling the tickets for $300 and $325, but only people on high end of the university's ticket scale have a real shot at getting them (along with faculty and students). 
First in line will be suite holders, scholarship donors and Beckwith Club members. Then it's Tigers Unlimited members, faculty and staff and students. The deadline for ordering is rapidly approaching. The fact Auburn has done little to promote its ticket sales tells you the tickets are a hot commodity. Here's the ticket information from Auburn. 




UGABuck wrote:
trurebel wrote: You put the SEC 1st place team vs. the SEC 6th place team and it is  a sellout.

Alabama vs. South Carolina......easy sellout.

Hell, you put the SEC 5th place vs. the SEC 6th place and it is a sellout.

LSU vs. South Carolina.....easy sellout.

You coulda put UT and AU in Atlanta and drew more than 40K......even this year.

lol
RidgeRoadRattler wrote:

---------------------------------------------
--- AceTommyBoy wrote:

The Big Ten conference championship game only had 40,000. No one wants to travel to watch a game in the north.

Seriously, who cares where the games are played? The Big Ten doesn't lose bowl games because of location, they lose because of inferior coaches and players.

---------------------------------------------

The Big Ten Championship game featured a 6th place team! Who wants to watch that?
I suppose where you are from math doesn't work well. Auburn couldn't sell their allotment of tickets for their BCSNCG. Now, don't get too embarrassed, it happens to schools like OSU that go to BCS games quite often.

However, think about this. Little ole SEC school Auburn that hasn't played in a BCS Championship Game or BCS games that I recall, couldn't get enough fans to travel all the way to Arizona? I guess those trailers aren't as portable as you think. wink
Whatever dude:

http://www.al.com/sports/index...g_more_tha.html

Are you touched? Here's the excerpt:

"Auburn absorbed a loss of $781,825 from 2,456 unsold tickets from its allotment of 17,400."

_____________________________________________
Michigan is French for "I quit!"

Reply | Quote

Posted: 12/6/2012 11:06 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


ugabuck there was some stink about those "unsold" tickets that auburn admins reported. more than a few folks over there accused the people in charge of selling the tickets of basically stealing them to either use themselves or sell themselves.redface

people were looking all over for tickets and SOMEONE{s} over there hid a stash and did something with them.

the way it was set up any tickets UNSOLD could be used basically how the ticket people/university brass wanted to.

instead of waiting for sales to stop and then seeing what they had left they saw how crazy sales were going and SOMEONE{s} basically stole the tickets for either personal use or personal gain by sale.
Reply | Quote

Posted: 12/6/2012 11:11 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


Go look at the photos from the game. Auburn, which travelled much further than Oregon, had at least 75% of the stadium
trurebel wrote: Move the goal posts much?

Auburn sold out her allotment of tickets.  Anybody saying otherwise is either clueless or a liar.

Have another article on how obsessive Auburn fans made their BCS game's ticket costs unprecedented.  Yeah.....but they didn't take anybody.....

You post an article about how much money they spent traveling to the bowl that never references how many tickets AU sold at all or that the game struggled to sell tickets......or anything of the sort.

You can't support your claim because you made it up out of thin air.......

Read another one and learn something.....

"There are no tickets to be had anywhere."

"The demand from Auburn fans, seeking their first national title since 1957, and to a lesser extent Oregon fans, seeking their first national title ever, was too much."


http://www.aolnews.com/2011/01...e-in-us-sports/
UGABuck wrote:
trurebel wrote: Yeah right.  AU couldn't drive any demand for tickets to the BCSNC game......none at all.....

Do you people ever leave your echo chamber?  How does it feel living in a bubble?

***********************************************

How hot a ticket is Monday's BCS Championship showdown between Auburn and Oregon? As of Wednesday evening, hot enough not only to frustrate the efforts of the kind of people who aren't used to making one to see a football game, but also to effectively break the big online ticket brokers: BothStubHub and TicketCity have actually stopped sales for the game due to a run on tickets that even the Super Bowl can't command.

"As a result of the high demand and scarcity of BCS National Championship Game tickets, we have been unable to fulfill some customers' orders," a StubHub spokesman said in a statement released Wednesday night. "Unfortunately, one of our larger sellers for this event could not secure enough tickets to fulfill all of their confirmed sales, which has caused a trickle-down effect." Needless to say, if you bought your ticket months ago, that effect could bring you quite a nice return on that investment this week.

Prior to shutting down sales, BCS Championship tickets on StubHub were starting at more than $3,880 on Wednesday afternoon, and climbing as high as $15,995 for a seat on the 50-yard line. The average ticket for the game had gone for slightly more than $1,100, making it the top-selling event in the history of the site. "Right now, it's unprecedented," Dan Rubendall, CEO of online ticket broker Zigabid.com, told the Portland Oregonian. "It's absolutely the craziest scene we've ever seen. I mean, this is bigger than any Super Bowl we've seen in 20 years."



******************************************
 

BCS title game a big ticket for Auburn fans



Auburn fans who don't donate to athletics may find tickets to the BCS national championship game tough to come by, but at least finding an airline ticket is a bit easier today.
Delta has added 4,500 seats to big-time bowl destinations, including five additional flights with 1,300 seats from Birmingham to Phoenix for the Jan. 10 championship game. Delta added two flights each on Jan. 7 and 8, and three return flights from Phoenix on the 11th, including two get-out-town-quick flights, one leaving at 1 a.m. and the other leaving at 2 a.m. You can be at work the next day. Delta added flights from Portland and Eugene for Oregon fans as well.
The game will be played in 73,000-seat University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.
Auburn received 17,000 tickets. Students were allotted 1,500 of those.
If you can't get a ticket through Auburn, you could try eBay. The highest priced ticket? $97,750. But shipping is free! Random spot check: Four together are $4,000. Two tickets listed as Auburn "donor" tickets are $1,999. That's for the pair.
StubHub has one in a suite for $70,590. StubHub lists tickets prices from about $700  to $100,003. Tickets from any place other than Auburn and Oregon figure to be pricey.Travel packages from Alabama are going for as much as $3,795.
Auburn is selling the tickets for $300 and $325, but only people on high end of the university's ticket scale have a real shot at getting them (along with faculty and students). 
First in line will be suite holders, scholarship donors and Beckwith Club members. Then it's Tigers Unlimited members, faculty and staff and students. The deadline for ordering is rapidly approaching. The fact Auburn has done little to promote its ticket sales tells you the tickets are a hot commodity. Here's the ticket information from Auburn. 




UGABuck wrote:
trurebel wrote: You put the SEC 1st place team vs. the SEC 6th place team and it is  a sellout.

Alabama vs. South Carolina......easy sellout.

Hell, you put the SEC 5th place vs. the SEC 6th place and it is a sellout.

LSU vs. South Carolina.....easy sellout.

You coulda put UT and AU in Atlanta and drew more than 40K......even this year.

lol
RidgeRoadRattler wrote:

---------------------------------------------
--- AceTommyBoy wrote:

The Big Ten conference championship game only had 40,000. No one wants to travel to watch a game in the north.

Seriously, who cares where the games are played? The Big Ten doesn't lose bowl games because of location, they lose because of inferior coaches and players.

---------------------------------------------

The Big Ten Championship game featured a 6th place team! Who wants to watch that?
I suppose where you are from math doesn't work well. Auburn couldn't sell their allotment of tickets for their BCSNCG. Now, don't get too embarrassed, it happens to schools like OSU that go to BCS games quite often.

However, think about this. Little ole SEC school Auburn that hasn't played in a BCS Championship Game or BCS games that I recall, couldn't get enough fans to travel all the way to Arizona? I guess those trailers aren't as portable as you think. wink
Whatever dude:

http://www.al.com/sports/index...g_more_tha.html
Reply | Quote

Posted: 12/6/2012 11:18 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 



lowiq wrote: ugabuck there was some stink about those "unsold" tickets that auburn admins reported. more than a few folks over there accused the people in charge of selling the tickets of basically stealing them to either use themselves or sell themselves.redface

people were looking all over for tickets and SOMEONE{s} over there hid a stash and did something with them.

the way it was set up any tickets UNSOLD could be used basically how the ticket people/university brass wanted to.

instead of waiting for sales to stop and then seeing what they had left they saw how crazy sales were going and SOMEONE{s} basically stole the tickets for either personal use or personal gain by sale.

Low, I am not saying you are wrong. That's always been Aubbie's MO. However, stink or not, I think we can agree that it isn't difficult to find unused tickets by any school. TruIdiot just doesn't understand a few things; football, the economics of football, the SEC (which I find amusing) and general logic.

And believe me, I would have held out a few tickets for the cheerleaders too! tongue

_____________________________________________
Michigan is French for "I quit!"

Reply | Quote
Avatar

Posted: 12/6/2012 11:57 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


You are the one that is totally clueless in every post you've made.

You make stuff up.....get called on it.....so you call names and change the topic.

Read it again if you are capable....

Auburn drove ticket prices of their BCSNC game to unprecedented levels.  It was the hardest ticket to get in years.

I still wait for you FIRST piece of evidence to support your claim.

Actually, I'm not waiting because you are not capable of supporting your claim since it was based in fantasy land......
UGABuck wrote:
lowiq wrote: ugabuck there was some stink about those "unsold" tickets that auburn admins reported. more than a few folks over there accused the people in charge of selling the tickets of basically stealing them to either use themselves or sell themselves.redface

people were looking all over for tickets and SOMEONE{s} over there hid a stash and did something with them.

the way it was set up any tickets UNSOLD could be used basically how the ticket people/university brass wanted to.

instead of waiting for sales to stop and then seeing what they had left they saw how crazy sales were going and SOMEONE{s} basically stole the tickets for either personal use or personal gain by sale.

Low, I am not saying you are wrong. That's always been Aubbie's MO. However, stink or not, I think we can agree that it isn't difficult to find unused tickets by any school. TruIdiot just doesn't understand a few things; football, the economics of football, the SEC (which I find amusing) and general logic.

And believe me, I would have held out a few tickets for the cheerleaders too! tongue
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Posted: 12/6/2012 5:41 PM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


I am saying Big 10 teams almost never have a comfort advantage in terms of stadium environment in bowl games.

The old Fiesta Bowl stadium and Ohio State may have been the exception as they beat Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame there.

IF they were still playing in the old stadium Ohio State may have fared better v. Florida (assuming knucklehead Roy Hall doesn't break Ted Ginn's ankle there as well). BUT, the game was moved to the new stadium thus whatever mental edge Ohio State would have had was gone.

The SEC has an an advantage playing in the Super Dome. The Pac 12 has an advantage playing in the Rose Bowl. Miami of Florida had an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl.


Very seldom is there a bowl game with a Big 10 team that screams Big 10 advantage. Due to location and or opponent most Big 10 bowl games look like tossups at best.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: I understand that.

My point was playing in the old stadium may have helped Ohio State since they were familiar with it. Playing in the new stadium did not benefit either team. I think teams are more comfortable with stadiums they are familiar with.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: You go into the Super Dome, or the Rose Bowl for the first time and tell me it's no worse than having played there before.

Your example of Ohio State @ Penn State is not valid because Ohio State plays @ Penn State every two years so they are familiar with the stadium.

Take Ohio State winning Fiesta Bowl v. Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame in old stadium, but getting crushed by Florida, and losing to Texas in the new stadium.

UF had never played in that stadium either.
Mark, I was at that game. Call me crazy, but UF looked pretty comfortable to me. So what you are really saying is.......neither team had an advantage.
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Posted: 12/6/2012 10:41 PM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


You are using this statement to prove AU counldn't sell their allotment?
Shameful.

Every team involved in BCS title game must "purchase" tickets for band,admins, etc. Those tickets are "unsold" to the public.


"The largest single-line expense item for both teams was unsold game tickets that get used for complimentary purposes to administrators, band members, cheerleaders and others.

Auburn absorbed a loss of $781,825 from 2,456 unsold tickets from its allotment of 17,400. Oregon lost $555,575 by withholding 1,761 of its 17,400 tickets."

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Posted: 12/7/2012 10:18 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 



buckeyemark wrote: I am saying Big 10 teams almost never have a comfort advantage in terms of stadium environment in bowl games.

The old Fiesta Bowl stadium and Ohio State may have been the exception as they beat Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame there.

IF they were still playing in the old stadium Ohio State may have fared better v. Florida (assuming knucklehead Roy Hall doesn't break Ted Ginn's ankle there as well). BUT, the game was moved to the new stadium thus whatever mental edge Ohio State would have had was gone.

The SEC has an an advantage playing in the Super Dome. The Pac 12 has an advantage playing in the Rose Bowl. Miami of Florida had an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl.


Very seldom is there a bowl game with a Big 10 team that screams Big 10 advantage. Due to location and or opponent most Big 10 bowl games look like tossups at best.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: I understand that.

My point was playing in the old stadium may have helped Ohio State since they were familiar with it. Playing in the new stadium did not benefit either team. I think teams are more comfortable with stadiums they are familiar with.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: You go into the Super Dome, or the Rose Bowl for the first time and tell me it's no worse than having played there before.

Your example of Ohio State @ Penn State is not valid because Ohio State plays @ Penn State every two years so they are familiar with the stadium.

Take Ohio State winning Fiesta Bowl v. Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame in old stadium, but getting crushed by Florida, and losing to Texas in the new stadium.

UF had never played in that stadium either.
Mark, I was at that game. Call me crazy, but UF looked pretty comfortable to me. So what you are really saying is.......neither team had an advantage.
So your saying the BIG needs to have some type of an advantage to win. I'll give you the Rose Bowl and Pac 12 arguement, but no SEC team plays in the Super Dome and if you think Miami has an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl in front of 15K fans I need some of what you're smoking. Using your logic Georgia should have beaten Bama last week.
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Posted: 12/8/2012 1:59 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 



18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: I am saying Big 10 teams almost never have a comfort advantage in terms of stadium environment in bowl games.

The old Fiesta Bowl stadium and Ohio State may have been the exception as they beat Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame there.

IF they were still playing in the old stadium Ohio State may have fared better v. Florida (assuming knucklehead Roy Hall doesn't break Ted Ginn's ankle there as well). BUT, the game was moved to the new stadium thus whatever mental edge Ohio State would have had was gone.

The SEC has an an advantage playing in the Super Dome. The Pac 12 has an advantage playing in the Rose Bowl. Miami of Florida had an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl.


Very seldom is there a bowl game with a Big 10 team that screams Big 10 advantage. Due to location and or opponent most Big 10 bowl games look like tossups at best.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: I understand that.

My point was playing in the old stadium may have helped Ohio State since they were familiar with it. Playing in the new stadium did not benefit either team. I think teams are more comfortable with stadiums they are familiar with.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: You go into the Super Dome, or the Rose Bowl for the first time and tell me it's no worse than having played there before.

Your example of Ohio State @ Penn State is not valid because Ohio State plays @ Penn State every two years so they are familiar with the stadium.

Take Ohio State winning Fiesta Bowl v. Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame in old stadium, but getting crushed by Florida, and losing to Texas in the new stadium.

UF had never played in that stadium either.
Mark, I was at that game. Call me crazy, but UF looked pretty comfortable to me. So what you are really saying is.......neither team had an advantage.
So your saying the BIG needs to have some type of an advantage to win. I'll give you the Rose Bowl and Pac 12 arguement, but no SEC team plays in the Super Dome and if you think Miami has an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl in front of 15K fans I need some of what you're smoking. Using your logic Georgia should have beaten Bama last week.
Dude when Lsu plays in the Superdome it is called home field advantage and ive seen them get that draw at least twice.
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Posted: 12/8/2012 3:43 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


"Auburn brought 938 people to Arizona, counting players, staff, band, cheerleaders and the official party."

That is where the unsold tickets went. Trust me, there were no UNUSED tickets, just unsold. My brother and I paid $2300 for a pair in the cheap seats. Quite a few people were stranded back in Alabama due to an ice storm and most (if not all) of their tickets were able to be sold at the last minute. We were offered $8000 for our pair just outside the gate right before we went in, but we both agreed that we would never forgive ourselves if we missed going. We had been waiting our entire lives for that experience.

---------------------------------------------
--- UGABuck wrote:


lowiq wrote: ugabuck there was some stink about those "unsold" tickets that auburn admins reported. more than a few folks over there accused the people in charge of selling the tickets of basically stealing them to either use themselves or sell themselves.redface

people were looking all over for tickets and SOMEONE{s} over there hid a stash and did something with them.

the way it was set up any tickets UNSOLD could be used basically how the ticket people/university brass wanted to.

instead of waiting for sales to stop and then seeing what they had left they saw how crazy sales were going and SOMEONE{s} basically stole the tickets for either personal use or personal gain by sale.

Low, I am not saying you are wrong. That's always been Aubbie's MO. However, stink or not, I think we can agree that it isn't difficult to find unused tickets by any school. TruIdiot just doesn't understand a few things; football, the economics of football, the SEC (which I find amusing) and general logic.

And believe me, I would have held out a few tickets for the cheerleaders too! tongue

---------------------------------------------
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Posted: 12/8/2012 4:52 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


well maybe but NY is not in the midwest.  Where should the bowl be?  Chicago?  Indianapolis didn't get it done for the B1G title game.
BillsPA wrote: Some bowl games should also be located in the North and Midwest as well as the south. FANS will travel to a game no matter where it's located.

NFL is having a future superbowl in the New York stadium... no reason college should not have some of the bowls above the mason dixon line.

It is 2012, not 1912. Progress is needed.
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Posted: 12/8/2012 4:57 AM

RE: Bowl games locations... wake up 


Chicago maybe but Green Bay?, not a chance in hell.  Bowl gam,es are about relaxing warm weather, a beach and a family vacation all in one.  The midwest will have a very tough sell.
BillsPA wrote: Soldier Field... Lambeu field... what FOOTBALL fan of these "southern" teams wouldn't WANT to watch their team play in those stadiums??? If they don't, they aren't a fan of football.
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Posted: 12/8/2012 5:21 PM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 



Stratbuck wrote:
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: I am saying Big 10 teams almost never have a comfort advantage in terms of stadium environment in bowl games.

The old Fiesta Bowl stadium and Ohio State may have been the exception as they beat Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame there.

IF they were still playing in the old stadium Ohio State may have fared better v. Florida (assuming knucklehead Roy Hall doesn't break Ted Ginn's ankle there as well). BUT, the game was moved to the new stadium thus whatever mental edge Ohio State would have had was gone.

The SEC has an an advantage playing in the Super Dome. The Pac 12 has an advantage playing in the Rose Bowl. Miami of Florida had an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl.


Very seldom is there a bowl game with a Big 10 team that screams Big 10 advantage. Due to location and or opponent most Big 10 bowl games look like tossups at best.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: I understand that.

My point was playing in the old stadium may have helped Ohio State since they were familiar with it. Playing in the new stadium did not benefit either team. I think teams are more comfortable with stadiums they are familiar with.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: You go into the Super Dome, or the Rose Bowl for the first time and tell me it's no worse than having played there before.

Your example of Ohio State @ Penn State is not valid because Ohio State plays @ Penn State every two years so they are familiar with the stadium.

Take Ohio State winning Fiesta Bowl v. Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame in old stadium, but getting crushed by Florida, and losing to Texas in the new stadium.

UF had never played in that stadium either.
Mark, I was at that game. Call me crazy, but UF looked pretty comfortable to me. So what you are really saying is.......neither team had an advantage.
So your saying the BIG needs to have some type of an advantage to win. I'll give you the Rose Bowl and Pac 12 arguement, but no SEC team plays in the Super Dome and if you think Miami has an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl in front of 15K fans I need some of what you're smoking. Using your logic Georgia should have beaten Bama last week.
Dude when Lsu plays in the Superdome it is called home field advantage and ive seen them get that draw at least twice.
They actually got that draw 3 times and are 2-1 in NC games there. One of those 3 teams didn't whine about the location and went in a kicked their butts.
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Posted: 12/8/2012 9:30 PM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


Or say play LSU in the Sugar Bowl? What does home field matter right?

---------------------------------------------
--- cincydawg4 wrote:

How big of an advantage is it to have bowl games in the south for southern teams?

I agree it would be tough for southern teams to play outdoors up north in January.

But is it an advantage to either side if you play football in decent weather in Orlando?

If so, how many points?

---------------------------------------------
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Posted: 12/9/2012 5:08 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 



BigMen wrote:
Stratbuck wrote:
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: I am saying Big 10 teams almost never have a comfort advantage in terms of stadium environment in bowl games.

The old Fiesta Bowl stadium and Ohio State may have been the exception as they beat Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame there.

IF they were still playing in the old stadium Ohio State may have fared better v. Florida (assuming knucklehead Roy Hall doesn't break Ted Ginn's ankle there as well). BUT, the game was moved to the new stadium thus whatever mental edge Ohio State would have had was gone.

The SEC has an an advantage playing in the Super Dome. The Pac 12 has an advantage playing in the Rose Bowl. Miami of Florida had an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl.


Very seldom is there a bowl game with a Big 10 team that screams Big 10 advantage. Due to location and or opponent most Big 10 bowl games look like tossups at best.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: I understand that.

My point was playing in the old stadium may have helped Ohio State since they were familiar with it. Playing in the new stadium did not benefit either team. I think teams are more comfortable with stadiums they are familiar with.
18of21 wrote:
buckeyemark wrote: You go into the Super Dome, or the Rose Bowl for the first time and tell me it's no worse than having played there before.

Your example of Ohio State @ Penn State is not valid because Ohio State plays @ Penn State every two years so they are familiar with the stadium.

Take Ohio State winning Fiesta Bowl v. Miami, Kansas State, and Notre Dame in old stadium, but getting crushed by Florida, and losing to Texas in the new stadium.

UF had never played in that stadium either.
Mark, I was at that game. Call me crazy, but UF looked pretty comfortable to me. So what you are really saying is.......neither team had an advantage.
So your saying the BIG needs to have some type of an advantage to win. I'll give you the Rose Bowl and Pac 12 arguement, but no SEC team plays in the Super Dome and if you think Miami has an advantage playing in the Orange Bowl in front of 15K fans I need some of what you're smoking. Using your logic Georgia should have beaten Bama last week.
Dude when Lsu plays in the Superdome it is called home field advantage and ive seen them get that draw at least twice.
They actually got that draw 3 times and are 2-1 in NC games there. One of those 3 teams didn't whine about the location and went in a kicked their butts.
One team does not win your argument bigman.
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Posted: 12/9/2012 6:29 AM

Re: Bowl games locations... wake up 


Everything about that Aubie season stank.  Cam was paid, the NCAA looked the other way and Chizik came out looking like a winner when he clearly never has been.  Now this story about some admins stealing tickets with paper trail.  Anybody buying that load of crap?
UGABuck wrote:
lowiq wrote: ugabuck there was some stink about those "unsold" tickets that auburn admins reported. more than a few folks over there accused the people in charge of selling the tickets of basically stealing them to either use themselves or sell themselves.redface

people were looking all over for tickets and SOMEONE{s} over there hid a stash and did something with them.

the way it was set up any tickets UNSOLD could be used basically how the ticket people/university brass wanted to.

instead of waiting for sales to stop and then seeing what they had left they saw how crazy sales were going and SOMEONE{s} basically stole the tickets for either personal use or personal gain by sale.

Low, I am not saying you are wrong. That's always been Aubbie's MO. However, stink or not, I think we can agree that it isn't difficult to find unused tickets by any school. TruIdiot just doesn't understand a few things; football, the economics of football, the SEC (which I find amusing) and general logic.

And believe me, I would have held out a few tickets for the cheerleaders too! tongue
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