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After Football: What Do I Do Now?

Posted: 7/14/2014 10:20 AM

After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


Serious article about UGA's approach:   Link

Last edited 7/14/2014 10:20 AM by beesbee

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Posted: 7/14/2014 10:43 AM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


I guess the players never listened to the NCAA promo about going pro in something other than sports.

Sad to hear about the depression and the tragic ending of life.

I guess not taking academics seriously does have life altering ramifications for some.

Last edited 7/14/2014 10:43 AM by BornAJacket

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Posted: 7/14/2014 10:47 AM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


I think that this article speaks to the networking power that FB players in particular at the big football schools can tap into. On this board, we oftentimes scratch our heads when a player picks a school like Uga or Auburn or wherever when they have the chance to go to a GT or a Stanford or Duke. In this article, the guy who went from working on the grounds crew to working for a Nascar team - no way that happens if he were a regular joe at Uga.

as to why he is working on the grounds crew in the first place, I think that speaks to the fact that for the person without a technical or vocational (i.e medicine related) degree, the supply far exceeds the demand these days (it seems).
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Posted: 7/14/2014 10:52 AM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


Doesn't the UGA approach fall into the category of extra benefits?

"His college career ended in 2008, and a short time later, he found himself working on the Georgia grounds crew.

Instead of playing on the grass at Sanford Stadium, he was mowing it." 

I think most who read this would agree that this was not a worthwhile application of educational resources.


Read more here: http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/2014/07/12/3197627/ help-for-when-the-dream-ends-richts.html#storylink =cpy
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Posted: 7/14/2014 11:09 AM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


The UGA program is commendable. But in addition to programs like this, there are other ways to contribute if the flame is still burning. Coaching. It doesn't matter at what level. Even helping out a pee-wee team can be rewarding. Many of these guys have young sons. Get involved with their teams.

There are hundreds of semi-pro teams all over the country. My son plays on one. The level of competition is like lower division college ball. Most of the players have some college experience and a few even played a season or two in the NFL. Most are in their mid 20s to late 30s. What they all share is a love for the game and the fellowship involved with a team sport.
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Posted: 7/14/2014 12:03 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


This is nice and all but I have a really radical idea...

MAKE THE PLAYERS GET A DAMN EDUCATION THAT WILL ALLOW THEM TO SUCCEED AFTER COLLEGE.banghead
________________________________
LeatherneckJacket wrote:  It was not magic that Gailey found these players who were better than their recruiting rankings.
                                           That was his plan.
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Posted: 7/14/2014 12:09 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



mts315 wrote: This is nice and all but I have a really radical idea...

MAKE THE PLAYERS GET A DAMN EDUCATION THAT WILL ALLOW THEM TO SUCCEED AFTER COLLEGE.banghead

I hear you but....the problems start way, way before they get to a college.
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Posted: 7/14/2014 12:15 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 





---------------------------------------------
--- mts315 wrote:

This is nice and all but I have a really radical idea...

MAKE THE PLAYERS GET A DAMN EDUCATION THAT WILL ALLOW THEM TO SUCCEED AFTER COLLEGE.banghead

---------------------------------------------

This is exactly what I said to my wife when she brought this up to me. This is a very sad story, but it just reinforces what many of us on here say all the time: it is a disservice to these kids to push them through these (mostly) worthless liberal arts majors. I would even advocate for technical/vocational programs put in specifically for athletes that will teach them real-life skills. They will get much more out of that than history of film or diversity in America or modern dance.

I hope one day that we will just end the charade and not make elite athletes attend college in order to advance in their chosen field. But that's a topic for another day.
"Time wounds all heels." -- John Lennon
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Posted: 7/14/2014 12:35 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



RambleOn84 wrote:


---------------------------------------------
--- mts315 wrote:

This is nice and all but I have a really radical idea...

MAKE THE PLAYERS GET A DAMN EDUCATION THAT WILL ALLOW THEM TO SUCCEED AFTER COLLEGE.banghead

---------------------------------------------

This is exactly what I said to my wife when she brought this up to me. This is a very sad story, but it just reinforces what many of us on here say all the time: it is a disservice to these kids to push them through these (mostly) worthless liberal arts majors. I would even advocate for technical/vocational programs put in specifically for athletes that will teach them real-life skills. They will get much more out of that than history of film or diversity in America or modern dance.

I hope one day that we will just end the charade and not make elite athletes attend college in order to advance in their chosen field. But that's a topic for another day.
Got involved in a blog about this with UGA fans and others. Here, for what it's worth, are my comments:

"Bogus courses are really the problem when it comes to how SA's (student athletes) are treated while in school. No wonder they are lost after football is over.

Being a Tech fan, the lack of a level playing field when it comes to the coursework required to stay eligible is a real bugaboo to me. For example, every one of our SA's has to pass a calculus course. They get a lot of tutoring, but they still have to pass the course. Would that every athlete in the SEC had that requirement or its equivalent. Then they might actually get an education that would enable them to get meaningful employment later in life.

From a recent poll, over 90% of the football scholarship SA's go to college with the expectation of getting into the NFL. The appeal of the easy, bogus courses is irresistible: Why choose a difficult curriculum if you're only there to get to the NFL? The percentage that actually makes an NFL roster is in the single digits. The remainder of the 90+% deserves a better shot at a real education than what most are getting.

BTW, I do respect UGA for having entrance requirements for SA's that are more restrictive than what most of the rest (if not all) of the SEC requires. However, they also are guilty of having bogus courses."

Last edited 7/14/2014 12:41 PM by beesbee

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Posted: 7/14/2014 12:39 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



mts315 wrote: This is nice and all but I have a really radical idea...

MAKE THE PLAYERS GET A DAMN EDUCATION THAT WILL ALLOW THEM TO SUCCEED AFTER COLLEGE.banghead
Yup.
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Posted: 7/14/2014 12:55 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


Paul's problem wasn't just money.

Jobs aren't the solution to the problem of depression after football, IMO. They might help, but it's really about managing the emotional letdown of an ending of an athletic career.

Correcting this is a matter of raising athletes to be men of fortitude and humility. Men who aspire to more than glory. People who really believe that their life is about making their communities better.

Paul's family are friends to me and we were all very sad about the choice he made. Looking forward, I think that making sure that young super-star athletes are empowered and encouraged to be community leaders as well as the "favorite son", they will have a goal that is ever-achievable and extends beyond the field.

Paul could have participated in so many things in his community. He'd have been welcome with open arms.

I just hope that the message that comes from his passing is that other young men who are frustrated and low toward the end of their playing careers can see the devastation his actions had on the people that cared for him. That's what will stick with me.

I wish Richt luck in this program and in his effort to lead these young men to a higher level of community stewardship. For all of the hate I have for his program, seeing the emotion on his face and in his voice at Paul's funeral made an impression on me. His example here is a good one.

I will add as a final note that our program seems to do a very good job of this overall. You see a whole lot of success stories re: former players in Tech's program. CPJ deserves some kudos for that IMO.

Last edited 7/14/2014 12:55 PM by buzzrocket

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Posted: 7/14/2014 1:19 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



buzzrocket wrote:
I will add as a final note that our program seems to do a very good job of this overall. You see a whole lot of success stories re: former players in Tech's program. CPJ deserves some kudos for that IMO.
I agree with all that you said. However, as far as CPJ getting kudos, I think the issue may be deeper than that (or a chicken and egg type thing).Generally speaking, the type of athlete who is recruited by GT is the type of student who, while maybe not cut out for engineering studies, is the type of kid who could very well get into another college or university (albeit one less rigorous than Ma Tech) on his own accord. Plus, a student athlete who would chose the rigors of playing ball at GT when other, easier options are available speaks to someone who embraces challenges in life.

all of this to say, the head coach at GT, regardless of whom it is, is working with a better caliber of students. it certainly makes the task on the field more challenging than what the head coach at Uga faces, but off the field the job relative to these issues is much, much easier (imo).
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Posted: 7/14/2014 1:35 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


I'll just put this here:

Coach Pelton @peester50  ·  Jul 12

give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. At Ga Tech, we learn how to buy the lake!

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Posted: 7/14/2014 1:47 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



4shotB wrote:
mts315 wrote: This is nice and all but I have a really radical idea...

MAKE THE PLAYERS GET A DAMN EDUCATION THAT WILL ALLOW THEM TO SUCCEED AFTER COLLEGE.banghead

I hear you but....the problems start way, way before they get to a college.

Yes, the radical idea should be...

MAKE SURE THE PLAYERS COMING INTO SCHOOL ARE CAPABLE OF DOING COLLEGE LEVEL WORK.

If someones coming into college with grade school math and reading skills it doesn't make much of a difference what they're studying.
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  • esa20
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Posted: 7/14/2014 2:01 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



4shotB wrote:
mts315 wrote: This is nice and all but I have a really radical idea...

MAKE THE PLAYERS GET A DAMN EDUCATION THAT WILL ALLOW THEM TO SUCCEED AFTER COLLEGE.banghead

I hear you but....the problems start way, way before they get to a college.
+1.

What they are majoring in is only a symptom of the issue. These kids have to be taught the value of an education much earlier in life.
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Posted: 7/14/2014 2:05 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



buzzrocket wrote: Paul's problem wasn't just money.

Jobs aren't the solution to the problem of depression after football, IMO. They might help, but it's really about managing the emotional letdown of an ending of an athletic career.

Correcting this is a matter of raising athletes to be men of fortitude and humility. Men who aspire to more than glory. People who really believe that their life is about making their communities better.

Paul's family are friends to me and we were all very sad about the choice he made. Looking forward, I think that making sure that young super-star athletes are empowered and encouraged to be community leaders as well as the "favorite son", they will have a goal that is ever-achievable and extends beyond the field.

Paul could have participated in so many things in his community. He'd have been welcome with open arms.

I just hope that the message that comes from his passing is that other young men who are frustrated and low toward the end of their playing careers can see the devastation his actions had on the people that cared for him. That's what will stick with me.

I wish Richt luck in this program and in his effort to lead these young men to a higher level of community stewardship. For all of the hate I have for his program, seeing the emotion on his face and in his voice at Paul's funeral made an impression on me. His example here is a good one.

I will add as a final note that our program seems to do a very good job of this overall. You see a whole lot of success stories re: former players in Tech's program. CPJ deserves some kudos for that IMO.
To me, the article was about much more than helping former players get jobs, as you have tried to point out, buzzrocket.

I haven't heard any failure stories from former football players at Tech, but I am sure there has to be some. Basketball, I remember when Anthony Sherrod took his life and Javaris Crittenton is a more recent example of a young man gone astray.
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Posted: 7/14/2014 2:20 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


All programs have those who struggle to cope. The Paul Oliver saga is terribly sad.

Kudos for CMR for moving to correct the issue. The UGA AA absolutely must move to get players in majors where they can make a living after football. It is no service to the young men to create bogus courses and degree programs. Taking advantage of their talents while not providing a solid education is borderline criminal, IMHO.
Georgian By Birth - Jacket By the Grace of God
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Posted: 7/14/2014 2:21 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 


UGA would not need this program if UGA offered a quality education in the first place.  What this amounts to is corporate welfare for undeducated NFL wannabees and flunkcouts.   It ought to be illegal to give a diploma for what you get with some of the majors from UGA.

This is obviously not a problem at GT.

Last edited 7/14/2014 2:22 PM by ctmoore8

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  • esa20
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Posted: 7/14/2014 2:31 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



ctmoore8 wrote: UGA would not need this program if UGA offered a quality education in the first place.  What this amounts to is corporate welfare for undeducated NFL wannabees and flunkcouts.   It ought to be illegal to give a diploma for what you get with some of the majors from UGA.

This is obviously not a problem at GT.
Dude, this is utterly ridiculous. You can get a great education at UGA, Bama, Colorado, WVU, Fort Valley St., Grand Valley St, etc. It's all about what the student is willing to put into it.

Last edited 7/14/2014 2:34 PM by esa20

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Posted: 7/14/2014 3:00 PM

Re: After Football: What Do I Do Now? 



esa20 wrote:
ctmoore8 wrote: UGA would not need this program if UGA offered a quality education in the first place.  What this amounts to is corporate welfare for undeducated NFL wannabees and flunkcouts.   It ought to be illegal to give a diploma for what you get with some of the majors from UGA.

This is obviously not a problem at GT.
Dude, this is utterly ridiculous. You can get a great education at UGA, Bama, Colorado, WVU, Fort Valley St., Grand Valley St, etc. It's all about what the student is willing to put into it.
What do you think the UGA football players "put into it" when they didn't know what to do with themselves after their football careers were over?  I did say "some of the majors at UGA".  My dog's vet is a UGA grad and I depend on advice from a county agent who graduated from the UGA Agriculture Department.  I don't think either one of them played football at UGA.  However, there are some degrees at UGA that it should be illegal to pass off as a college education.
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