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Giant Dawn Redwood

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Posted: 5/8/2014 6:45 PM

Giant Dawn Redwood 


I purchased this beauty of a tree back in 1992 and it is the tallest tree in our yard now.

Sarah in SE IL, zone 6b/5a, a country girl to the bone who never gets tired of planting more beauties.  Life member of NHGC since 12/1996.
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Posted: 5/9/2014 1:09 PM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


I've seen a lot of these advertised lately. Nice to have a 70 million year old species, lot of history there. I guess the only older tree species is the gingko. Is this the last remaining deciduous conifer species? I don't know of any others.

High desert grass and shrubland, zone 5, cold desert of Northern Nevada. 
Reporting live from the deadly Forty Mile Desert of Nevada.

Last edited 5/9/2014 1:10 PM by ruby2s

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Posted: 5/9/2014 1:33 PM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


Bald cypress is one and maybe one other I don't know how to spell.

There are three trees I want to get planted so I can enjoy them before I get too old and croak...bald cypress, beech and quaking aspen.

Our giant dawn redwood gets such gorgeous coppery colored leaves in the fall.
Sarah in SE IL, zone 6b/5a, a country girl to the bone who never gets tired of planting more beauties.  Life member of NHGC since 12/1996.
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Posted: 5/9/2014 6:12 PM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


Quaking aspen (or quakies or quakin' asp) are thought to be the oldest living things on the planet. Some are estimated to be 3,000 years old (a little older than the giant redwoods and sequoias of California). But you can't tell by looking at them. They sucker a lot and it is the root system that lives on after the individual trees die and are replaced. Their root system can cover several acres for a single plant and have hundreds of individual "trees". But, that's in the wilds, not in a garden.

High desert grass and shrubland, zone 5, cold desert of Northern Nevada. 
Reporting live from the deadly Forty Mile Desert of Nevada.
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Posted: 5/9/2014 6:49 PM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


That's what they make brush blades for...we have a dandy Stihl string trimmer with a couple of brush blades and that takes care of many things that sucker around here. Some things, we dig up the suckers and plant them somewhere else in the yard.  I have five or six Thundercloud purple flowering plums that husband dug up the original start from in 1990.  I kept digging up the side shoots and planting them around the yard and they are so beautiful.  Our honey bees love to work the blossoms on them. The original start he brought home has now died. 
Sarah in SE IL, zone 6b/5a, a country girl to the bone who never gets tired of planting more beauties.  Life member of NHGC since 12/1996.
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Posted: 8/25/2014 5:58 AM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


I know this post is old, but still......I find it interesting that you have a Giant Red Wood. Always thought it would be wonderful to have one. .......how big was yours when you purchased it, and how tall is it now????
Dawn.......Zone 6a.......Niantic, CT
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Posted: 8/25/2014 6:35 AM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


It is the tallest tree in our whole 3 acre yard; husband guesses 35' tall now.  It is a true beauty with its fern-y leaves and they turn copper-y after frost.  I cannot recall how big it was when I purchased it but it was just a standard sized tree.  It is a cone-shaped tree and does not have a huge base foot-print like a maple or most other trees.
Sarah in SE IL, zone 6b/5a, a country girl to the bone who never gets tired of planting more beauties.  Life member of NHGC since 12/1996.
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Posted: 8/25/2014 12:57 PM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


Dawn, did you confuse the giant "DAWN Redwood" with the giant "California Redwood"? Dawn redwoods are deciduous (loose their leaves in winter), are native to China, grow to 100 feet or more, and can live for 100's of years. California redwoods are evergreens native to the western US, grow to 300 feet or more, and can live for over 2,000 years. Totally different trees.

High desert grass and shrubland, zone 5, cold desert of Northern Nevada. 
Reporting live from the deadly Forty Mile Desert of Nevada.
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Posted: 9/2/2014 5:39 PM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


I think the Tamarak is a deciduous conifer. Had one at a four-plex I lived in, in Illinois. Didn't know what it was then. Was surprised when it lost its needles!
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Posted: 9/2/2014 8:56 PM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


Yes tamaracks are deciduous as well. I have 6 of them that the original owner dug from a tamarack swamp up north and planted here. I don't know how long they'll last but they've been here for approaching 30 years now. I've always been amazed by them as they generally prefer a somewhat acidic soil which I definitely do not have here. The needles are so soft and turn a lovely shade of gold in the fall before dropping and clogging the rain gutters on the garage LOL.
Joyce H. MN zone 4
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Posted: 9/3/2014 8:25 AM

Re: Giant Dawn Redwood 


Here is some nice info on the Giant Dawn Redwood:

http://www.monumentaltrees.com/en/trees/dawnredwood/dawnredwood/
Sarah in SE IL, zone 6b/5a, a country girl to the bone who never gets tired of planting more beauties.  Life member of NHGC since 12/1996.
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