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The Glory Years

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Posted: 8/20/2014 5:32 PM

The Glory Years 


1954 to 1989

The Hawgs had only two losing seasons in that 36 year period.

Record: 284-111-9

Finished the Season in the Top 20: 22 Times

13 Top Ten Finishes

11 Won or Shared SWC Championships

23 Bowl Games, 14 Major Bowls (equivalent to BSC bowls).

To put it in perspective the Hawgs were going to an elite bowl every 2.5 years and Conference title every three years, had they continued that run in the SEC they could have had:

At least 6 BCS Bowl appearances

As many as 8 SEC Championships

And had there been a bowl for 75% of the teams, as there is today, the Hawgs would have gone to 34 bowls, instead of 23.  A bowl actually used to mean something.

This is why those of us that grew up with Razorback football in the 60's, 70's and 80's can be so frustrated, yet hopeful.  We know it can happen again.

WPS
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Posted: 8/20/2014 7:34 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


Some good numbers, hopefully we will start to head back to those stats and start a new Glory Years
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Posted: 8/20/2014 8:26 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


I really believe we were headed in that direction until the motorcycle wreck!mad
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Posted: 8/20/2014 8:31 PM

Re: The Glory Years 





---------------------------------------------
--- southhillcougfan wrote:

1954 to 1989

The Hawgs had only two losing seasons in that 36 year period.

Record: 284-111-9

Finished the Season in the Top 20: 22 Times

13 Top Ten Finishes

11 Won or Shared SWC Championships

23 Bowl Games, 14 Major Bowls (equivalent to BSC bowls).

To put it in perspective the Hawgs were going to an elite bowl every 2.5 years and Conference title every three years, had they continued that run in the SEC they could have had:

At least 6 BCS Bowl appearances

As many as 8 SEC Championships

And had there been a bowl for 75% of the teams, as there is today, the Hawgs would have gone to 34 bowls, instead of 23.  A bowl actually used to mean something.

This is why those of us that grew up with Razorback football in the 60's, 70's and 80's can be so frustrated, yet hopeful.  We know it can happen again.

WPS

---------------------------------------------

Yep
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Posted: 8/20/2014 8:31 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


No way! Big difference in the SWC And the SEC.
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Posted: 8/20/2014 8:42 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


Sec didn't rule the roost in those days.SWC had Texas ,Hogs,A&M,and Baylor and SMU were salty at times.
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Posted: 8/20/2014 9:33 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


I grew up in a very small town in AR, I can remember as a small child in the sixties trying to listen to Hogs on AM radio, Every Saturday my dad dedicated someone to man the radio to keep it tuned in. Those were the days to me. Really!

ONE OF THESE DAYS ALICE-POW!-RIGHT IN THE KISSER.

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Posted: 8/20/2014 11:37 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


As somebody who has a foot planted in both eras, I don’t think we can even compare the challenges today to the success we had during “The Glory Years.” The first Razorback game I remember getting excited about was the Cotton Bowl against Georgia. That was a great introduction to Razorback football.

I believe the season after that was Frank's last year, and it was a down year. I remember they broadcast one of the last games on ABC because the game was his swan song.

That was what, 5 years or so after teams in the South  began regularly recruiting and playing African American players?

By the time Lou Holtz took over, there were usually only two meaningful games...Texas and one of the other three or four teams that happened to be up in any given year.  The usual suspects included Houston, SMU, and Texas A&M. Arkansas had the terrible habit of losing to one of those teams whenever we managed to beat Texas.  The essence of life was beating Texas.

Even so, one loss and we could still finish in the top 10 and play in a major bowl.  The Orange Bowl was glorious.  There was nothing like being a double digit underdog and spanking the other team on national TV.  That #3 ranking felt like a national championship.

The ‘79 Sugar Bowl, though, was another thing.  Bear Bryant's teams were the class of college football by that time, and we just couldn't quite hang in there.  The difference in talent was obvious.

While we competed very favorably in the Hatfield years, the SWC without SMU was already in decline. We could run the table in the SWC, but struggle against teams like Miami and Oklahoma.  Those old Arkansas coaches were ahead of the game in recruiting athletes from South Florida and metropolitan Texas.

We put up our best fight when Atwater dropped the interception that could have sealed a victory and an 11-0 season against Miami.  Still, I don't think we were in a position at that point to contend for the national championship. It was just as well, considering how UCLA's defense had their way with us in the Cotton Bowl. Another team with a metropolitan recruiting base had us out matched.

We entered the SEC in a time of turmoil.  Had we not had the dustup with Coach Hatfield, the impulse hire of Jack Crowe, the interim Joe Kines, and the consultant turned head coach, Danny Ford, I think we would have probably won the Western division early on (more than once and not by default) because Alabama and LSU were slipping into the deep funk caused by coaching change and probation.

During the super power slide, Ole Miss and MSU took advantage of their population base and made the west almost even from top to bottom.  Houston Nutt arrived at that time, and if he had been judged only on his ability to win the big one, he would still be coach.  The problem was, he had trouble winning some of the games we should have won in the West, and we could not win a game against the Beasts of the East to save our lives.

Except for the rubber match against Tennessee the year after we flirted with the national championship, and the game in Fayetteville with D-Mac, have we yet to win another game against Tennessee, Georgia or Florida? There was Greg Childs miracle catch in Athens, but lord we owed them that after we scored a thousand points at home against the Dogs and still figured out a way to lose. But the SEC championship thumping by Georgia after the Miracle on Markham was probably more representative of our relative strength.

Meanwhile, instead of playing musical chairs with its coaches, South Carolina hired two former national championship winners and actually stuck with the last one.  It took five or more years, but Spurrier finally turned the Cocks into consistent winners.

Add in Missouri and Texas A&M, and what we have here is a challenge unparalleled in program history.  No coach at any time has ever faced a schedule like the schedule we face now.

This program is at a turning point where it will either hang on for dear life to the middle tier of teams that occasionally competes for a title, or it will compete with Kentucky for the bottom.  Given the demographics, the population base, and the available talent in the region, it would be very easy to let the latter happen.  It doesn't help that Central Arkansas high school football has slipped over the years.

Now as much as I loved the last two years under BP, he never demonstrated one time in his tenure that we were any where close to being competitive with the top tier teams in our conference or around the country.  Our best victory was BP's last one against an unexciting Kansas State team.

Other than that, we didn't score a rushing touchdown against Alabama during his entire coaching tenure. We lost five games in 2010 and 2011, all against every single top ranked team we played.  Only two were close. Both of those ended in interceptions being thrown to the other team as we desperately attempted to pass the ball against some of the best secondary and linebacking talent that we’ve ever faced.


The efforts against LSU and Alabama in 2011 were probably some of the most underwhelming I can remember as a Razorback fan.  We didn't even seem like we belonged on the same field, when we had managed to beat both of those teams at times when we were supposedly mediocre. Heck, old Hootie beat LSU the year the Tigers won the crystal football.

So, while I remember the end of the glory years fondly and I love reading and hearing about the greatness of the 1960s, the times were a changin', and there is no comparison from that time to the challenges we face now.  The demographics and the talent bases are entirely different, and the changes did not all work in our favor.  The overall quality of the teams we face on a regular basis is just astounding.

The best we can do, IMO, is seek stability under a coach that has a reputation for putting players in the NFL and who hires highly regarded position coaches and recruiters who can reach beyond the Ozark Hills and the Arklatex to find the type of talent we desperately need to win on a consistent basis. Even then, it may take five years to return to consistent competitiveness. (Then again, it may not).

At the end of the day, it is not about the system that a coach runs or whether he gets the most out of mediocre talent.  Smoke and mirrors will not hold up on a long term basis to putting the best, most well prepared, and best conditioned athletes on the field on game day.

As Forrest Gump would say, "That's all I have to say about that." crazy
"Someone once told me, 'Time is a flat circle.' Everything we've ever done or will do, we're gonna do over and over and over again."

Last edited 8/20/2014 11:50 PM by NostraHOGus

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Posted: 8/21/2014 9:41 AM

Re: The Glory Years 


Even during "the glory years" our record against SEC teams was weak. Check our bowl record. Frank had a hard time beating ole piss. Of course, the refs tended to help ole piss especially in made field goals.
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Posted: 8/21/2014 9:58 AM

Re: The Glory Years 



NostraHOGus wrote: As somebody who has a foot planted in both eras, I don’t think we can even compare the challenges today to the success we had during “The Glory Years.” The first Razorback game I remember getting excited about was the Cotton Bowl against Georgia. That was a great introduction to Razorback football.

I believe the season after that was Frank's last year, and it was a down year. I remember they broadcast one of the last games on ABC because the game was his swan song.

That was what, 5 years or so after teams in the South  began regularly recruiting and playing African American players?

By the time Lou Holtz took over, there were usually only two meaningful games...Texas and one of the other three or four teams that happened to be up in any given year.  The usual suspects included Houston, SMU, and Texas A&M. Arkansas had the terrible habit of losing to one of those teams whenever we managed to beat Texas.  The essence of life was beating Texas.

Even so, one loss and we could still finish in the top 10 and play in a major bowl.  The Orange Bowl was glorious.  There was nothing like being a double digit underdog and spanking the other team on national TV.  That #3 ranking felt like a national championship.

The ‘79 Sugar Bowl, though, was another thing.  Bear Bryant's teams were the class of college football by that time, and we just couldn't quite hang in there.  The difference in talent was obvious.

While we competed very favorably in the Hatfield years, the SWC without SMU was already in decline. We could run the table in the SWC, but struggle against teams like Miami and Oklahoma.  Those old Arkansas coaches were ahead of the game in recruiting athletes from South Florida and metropolitan Texas.

We put up our best fight when Atwater dropped the interception that could have sealed a victory and an 11-0 season against Miami.  Still, I don't think we were in a position at that point to contend for the national championship. It was just as well, considering how UCLA's defense had their way with us in the Cotton Bowl. Another team with a metropolitan recruiting base had us out matched.

We entered the SEC in a time of turmoil.  Had we not had the dustup with Coach Hatfield, the impulse hire of Jack Crowe, the interim Joe Kines, and the consultant turned head coach, Danny Ford, I think we would have probably won the Western division early on (more than once and not by default) because Alabama and LSU were slipping into the deep funk caused by coaching change and probation.

During the super power slide, Ole Miss and MSU took advantage of their population base and made the west almost even from top to bottom.  Houston Nutt arrived at that time, and if he had been judged only on his ability to win the big one, he would still be coach.  The problem was, he had trouble winning some of the games we should have won in the West, and we could not win a game against the Beasts of the East to save our lives.

Except for the rubber match against Tennessee the year after we flirted with the national championship, and the game in Fayetteville with D-Mac, have we yet to win another game against Tennessee, Georgia or Florida? There was Greg Childs miracle catch in Athens, but lord we owed them that after we scored a thousand points at home against the Dogs and still figured out a way to lose. But the SEC championship thumping by Georgia after the Miracle on Markham was probably more representative of our relative strength.

Meanwhile, instead of playing musical chairs with its coaches, South Carolina hired two former national championship winners and actually stuck with the last one.  It took five or more years, but Spurrier finally turned the Cocks into consistent winners.

Add in Missouri and Texas A&M, and what we have here is a challenge unparalleled in program history.  No coach at any time has ever faced a schedule like the schedule we face now.

This program is at a turning point where it will either hang on for dear life to the middle tier of teams that occasionally competes for a title, or it will compete with Kentucky for the bottom.  Given the demographics, the population base, and the available talent in the region, it would be very easy to let the latter happen.  It doesn't help that Central Arkansas high school football has slipped over the years.

Now as much as I loved the last two years under BP, he never demonstrated one time in his tenure that we were any where close to being competitive with the top tier teams in our conference or around the country.  Our best victory was BP's last one against an unexciting Kansas State team.

Other than that, we didn't score a rushing touchdown against Alabama during his entire coaching tenure. We lost five games in 2010 and 2011, all against every single top ranked team we played.  Only two were close. Both of those ended in interceptions being thrown to the other team as we desperately attempted to pass the ball against some of the best secondary and linebacking talent that we’ve ever faced.


The efforts against LSU and Alabama in 2011 were probably some of the most underwhelming I can remember as a Razorback fan.  We didn't even seem like we belonged on the same field, when we had managed to beat both of those teams at times when we were supposedly mediocre. Heck, old Hootie beat LSU the year the Tigers won the crystal football.

So, while I remember the end of the glory years fondly and I love reading and hearing about the greatness of the 1960s, the times were a changin', and there is no comparison from that time to the challenges we face now.  The demographics and the talent bases are entirely different, and the changes did not all work in our favor.  The overall quality of the teams we face on a regular basis is just astounding.

The best we can do, IMO, is seek stability under a coach that has a reputation for putting players in the NFL and who hires highly regarded position coaches and recruiters who can reach beyond the Ozark Hills and the Arklatex to find the type of talent we desperately need to win on a consistent basis. Even then, it may take five years to return to consistent competitiveness. (Then again, it may not).

At the end of the day, it is not about the system that a coach runs or whether he gets the most out of mediocre talent.  Smoke and mirrors will not hold up on a long term basis to putting the best, most well prepared, and best conditioned athletes on the field on game day.

As Forrest Gump would say, "That's all I have to say about that." crazy
Good post Nostra!
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Posted: 8/21/2014 10:46 AM

Re: The Glory Years 


Nostras last 2 paragraphs were dead on. We have a few issues that make it harder on us than most of the other SEC teams. Like it or not, it is factual.

1. Population: Ar is @ 3 million The only other state in the SEC that small is MS, and they have 2 SEC schools to split recruits. Most kids want to stay fairly close to home so big momma can watch them play. Arkansas having a smaller population combined with the demographics has made it harder to find a lot of good in-state talent. Not many folks raised outside of our states boundaries will "call the Hogs" growing up. I would argue that if MS only had 1 SEC school that they would have won more championships, and done a lot better over the years, because of their demographics.
Texas: about 26 million
Florida: about 19 million
Georgia: about 9 million
TN: about 6.5 million
MO: about 6 million
AL: about 5 million
SC: about 5 million
LA: about 4.7 million
Kentucky: about 4.5 million
Then there is MS and AR.
Numbers don't lie, and wherever there are more people there will be more good football players to pick from.
We need to be recruiting TX and Florida hard which this staff is doing. 
2. Stigma: People that don't actually know anything about our wonderful state, and continuing to pounce on old times and beliefs are absolutely pathetic, and stupid (see Clay Travis). We are continually talked down to, and about, and at some point (especially with impressionable 18 year olds) perception becomes reality, when it really is just the opposite.
(I KNOW SEVERAL MEMPHIANS THAT THINK THE WHOLE STATE IS JUST LIKE THE TRIP FROM WEST MEMPHIS TO LITTLE ROCK)
3. High Schools in SE AR.: There are some extremely talented players in SE AR that are not getting "coached up" to the level they need to be and/or academically prepared for college because of their financial situations (the schools). They just don't have the money to get the good coaches and staffs that they need. I would love to see some changes made by the state to get these schools some added help. 
I believe once the kids come to the campus and see how unbelievable it is, they get their eyes opened up. Thank goodness for the great alumni base, and all the donations from individuals and local companies over the years. The U of A is a remarkable school, and I expect our football program is headed in the right direction. We must be patient though, Rome wasn't built in a day.
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Posted: 8/21/2014 11:18 AM

Re: The Glory Years 



NostraHOGus wrote: 

Meanwhile, instead of playing musical chairs with its coaches, South Carolina hired two former national championship winners and actually stuck with the last one.  It took five or more years, but Spurrier finally turned the Cocks into consistent winners.



The best we can do, IMO, is seek stability under a coach that has a reputation for putting players in the NFL and who hires highly regarded position coaches and recruiters who can reach beyond the Ozark Hills and the Arklatex to find the type of talent we desperately need to win on a consistent basis. Even then, it may take five years to return to consistent competitiveness. (Then again, it may not).

At the end of the day, it is not about the system that a coach runs or whether he gets the most out of mediocre talent.  Smoke and mirrors will not hold up on a long term basis to putting the best, most well prepared, and best conditioned athletes on the field on game day.

As Forrest Gump would say, "That's all I have to say about that." crazy

You make several good points, but to me the most important is that it takes time to rebuild.  It took time for Visor-boy to turn around USC-E and it will take time for CBB to build the team that he wants.  The point that Schiano made yesterday is that CBB has a plan and is committed to that plan.  He also said that he didn't care what the plan was, as long as the coach sticks to it.

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Posted: 8/21/2014 11:34 AM

Re: The Glory Years 



southhillcougfan wrote: 1954 to 1989

The Hawgs had only two losing seasons in that 36 year period.

Record: 284-111-9

Finished the Season in the Top 20: 22 Times

13 Top Ten Finishes

11 Won or Shared SWC Championships

23 Bowl Games, 14 Major Bowls (equivalent to BSC bowls).

To put it in perspective the Hawgs were going to an elite bowl every 2.5 years and Conference title every three years, had they continued that run in the SEC they could have had:

At least 6 BCS Bowl appearances

As many as 8 SEC Championships

And had there been a bowl for 75% of the teams, as there is today, the Hawgs would have gone to 34 bowls, instead of 23.  A bowl actually used to mean something.

This is why those of us that grew up with Razorback football in the 60's, 70's and 80's can be so frustrated, yet hopeful.  We know it can happen again.

WPS
Amen X 1,000...
___________________
Been there, done that.
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Posted: 8/21/2014 11:47 AM

Re: The Glory Years 



NostraHOGus wrote:

.  Smoke and mirrors will not hold up on a long term basis to putting the best, most well prepared, and best conditioned athletes on the field on game day.

As Forrest Gump would say, "That's all I have to say about that." crazy
Which requires a superb coach and staff and a University willing to PAY TODAY's 4 and 5* athletes for the privilege of attending the UNIVERSITY. Athletes such as those at Alabama, Auburn, Georgia, Florida, Ohio State, Texas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State. I think we have the coach and staff. I just don't know if we can or WILL match the illegal funds flowing to today's players.
___________________
Been there, done that.
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Posted: 8/21/2014 1:42 PM

Re: The Glory Years 




That's verbose, even for you Nostra. And you make some great points.
---------------------------------------------
--- NostraHOGus wrote:

As somebody who has a foot planted in both eras, I don’t think we can even compare the challenges today to the success we had during “The Glory Years.” The first Razorback game I remember getting excited about was the Cotton Bowl against Georgia. That was a great introduction to Razorback football.

I believe the season after that was Frank's last year, and it was a down year. I remember they broadcast one of the last games on ABC because the game was his swan song.

That was what, 5 years or so after teams in the South  began regularly recruiting and playing African American players?

By the time Lou Holtz took over, there were usually only two meaningful games...Texas and one of the other three or four teams that happened to be up in any given year.  The usual suspects included Houston, SMU, and Texas A&M. Arkansas had the terrible habit of losing to one of those teams whenever we managed to beat Texas.  The essence of life was beating Texas.

Even so, one loss and we could still finish in the top 10 and play in a major bowl.  The Orange Bowl was glorious.  There was nothing like being a double digit underdog and spanking the other team on national TV.  That #3 ranking felt like a national championship.

The ‘79 Sugar Bowl, though, was another thing.  Bear Bryant's teams were the class of college football by that time, and we just couldn't quite hang in there.  The difference in talent was obvious.

While we competed very favorably in the Hatfield years, the SWC without SMU was already in decline. We could run the table in the SWC, but struggle against teams like Miami and Oklahoma.  Those old Arkansas coaches were ahead of the game in recruiting athletes from South Florida and metropolitan Texas.

We put up our best fight when Atwater dropped the interception that could have sealed a victory and an 11-0 season against Miami.  Still, I don't think we were in a position at that point to contend for the national championship. It was just as well, considering how UCLA's defense had their way with us in the Cotton Bowl. Another team with a metropolitan recruiting base had us out matched.

We entered the SEC in a time of turmoil.  Had we not had the dustup with Coach Hatfield, the impulse hire of Jack Crowe, the interim Joe Kines, and the consultant turned head coach, Danny Ford, I think we would have probably won the Western division early on (more than once and not by default) because Alabama and LSU were slipping into the deep funk caused by coaching change and probation.

During the super power slide, Ole Miss and MSU took advantage of their population base and made the west almost even from top to bottom.  Houston Nutt arrived at that time, and if he had been judged only on his ability to win the big one, he would still be coach.  The problem was, he had trouble winning some of the games we should have won in the West, and we could not win a game against the Beasts of the East to save our lives.

Except for the rubber match against Tennessee the year after we flirted with the national championship, and the game in Fayetteville with D-Mac, have we yet to win another game against Tennessee, Georgia or Florida? There was Greg Childs miracle catch in Athens, but lord we owed them that after we scored a thousand points at home against the Dogs and still figured out a way to lose. But the SEC championship thumping by Georgia after the Miracle on Markham was probably more representative of our relative strength.

Meanwhile, instead of playing musical chairs with its coaches, South Carolina hired two former national championship winners and actually stuck with the last one.  It took five or more years, but Spurrier finally turned the Cocks into consistent winners.

Add in Missouri and Texas A&M, and what we have here is a challenge unparalleled in program history.  No coach at any time has ever faced a schedule like the schedule we face now.

This program is at a turning point where it will either hang on for dear life to the middle tier of teams that occasionally competes for a title, or it will compete with Kentucky for the bottom.  Given the demographics, the population base, and the available talent in the region, it would be very easy to let the latter happen.  It doesn't help that Central Arkansas high school football has slipped over the years.

Now as much as I loved the last two years under BP, he never demonstrated one time in his tenure that we were any where close to being competitive with the top tier teams in our conference or around the country.  Our best victory was BP's last one against an unexciting Kansas State team.

Other than that, we didn't score a rushing touchdown against Alabama during his entire coaching tenure. We lost five games in 2010 and 2011, all against every single top ranked team we played.  Only two were close. Both of those ended in interceptions being thrown to the other team as we desperately attempted to pass the ball against some of the best secondary and linebacking talent that we’ve ever faced.


The efforts against LSU and Alabama in 2011 were probably some of the most underwhelming I can remember as a Razorback fan.  We didn't even seem like we belonged on the same field, when we had managed to beat both of those teams at times when we were supposedly mediocre. Heck, old Hootie beat LSU the year the Tigers won the crystal football.

So, while I remember the end of the glory years fondly and I love reading and hearing about the greatness of the 1960s, the times were a changin', and there is no comparison from that time to the challenges we face now.  The demographics and the talent bases are entirely different, and the changes did not all work in our favor.  The overall quality of the teams we face on a regular basis is just astounding.

The best we can do, IMO, is seek stability under a coach that has a reputation for putting players in the NFL and who hires highly regarded position coaches and recruiters who can reach beyond the Ozark Hills and the Arklatex to find the type of talent we desperately need to win on a consistent basis. Even then, it may take five years to return to consistent competitiveness. (Then again, it may not).

At the end of the day, it is not about the system that a coach runs or whether he gets the most out of mediocre talent.  Smoke and mirrors will not hold up on a long term basis to putting the best, most well prepared, and best conditioned athletes on the field on game day.

As Forrest Gump would say, "That's all I have to say about that." crazy


---------------------------------------------

Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.

Albert Einstein

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Posted: 8/21/2014 2:42 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


Just  so I don't sound pessimistic or fatalistic, let me say this.  It it impossible to watch the classic Arkansas victories (and even some of the losses) and not see one common element....DESIRE.   Arkansas players have always played best when they had a chip on their shoulder.  It wasn't anger or rage.  It was more like a barely controlled exuberance. They just couldn't wait to knock the other guy off his swagger while a lot of other people were watching. That exuberance caused early turnovers for the other team and contributed to swarming defense.

Part of the challenge of recruiting is not just getting  as many stars as possible.  Stars ARE important, but teams like Arkansas need players who are committed to getting better and making the most of their opportunity. With scholarship limits, we cannot afford to lose talented players because they won't do the class work or because they would rather smoke weed and drive cars without license plates. Alabama can lose a half dozen highly rated players and still have a half dozen more ready to fill in the gaps.

I would take a 3 star with 5 star desire and commitment over a 5 star with a sense of entitlement and character issues.  I think you can get more out of the first type of player in the long run.
"Someone once told me, 'Time is a flat circle.' Everything we've ever done or will do, we're gonna do over and over and over again."
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Posted: 8/21/2014 3:16 PM

Re: The Glory Years 





---------------------------------------------
--- Hogbaugh wrote:

Even during "the glory years" our record against SEC teams was weak. Check our bowl record. Frank had a hard time beating ole piss. Of course, the refs tended to help ole piss especially in made field goals.

---------------------------------------------

Now granted Alabama out classed us, but other than that we held our own. We were very bad in bowl games. But in those days the PAC 10, big 10, big 8 SEC and SWC or all on equal footing.

And the refs not only killed us against ole miss, but also against Texas. The worst I ever saw was the pass interference against SMU.
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Posted: 8/21/2014 4:30 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


That's why I was upset over Ascolese, on signing day he said all those that didn't pick AR, he was going to knock their block off. That's the kind of kids we need. Proving a point to others. Right now Philon does it as a message to Saban. If the rest of the team had that chip, we wouldn't have went 3-9 last year, and we definately won't go 3-9 this year.

---------------------------------------------
--- NostraHOGus wrote:

Just  so I don't sound pessimistic or fatalistic, let me say this.  It it impossible to watch the classic Arkansas victories (and even some of the losses) and not see one common element....DESIRE.   Arkansas players have always played best when they had a chip on their shoulder.  It wasn't anger or rage.  It was more like a barely controlled exuberance. They just couldn't wait to knock the other guy off his swagger while a lot of other people were watching. That exuberance caused early turnovers for the other team and contributed to swarming defense.

Part of the challenge of recruiting is not just getting  as many stars as possible.  Stars ARE important, but teams like Arkansas need players who are committed to getting better and making the most of their opportunity. With scholarship limits, we cannot afford to lose talented players because they won't do the class work or because they would rather smoke weed and drive cars without license plates. Alabama can lose a half dozen highly rated players and still have a half dozen more ready to fill in the gaps.

I would take a 3 star with 5 star desire and commitment over a 5 star with a sense of entitlement and character issues.  I think you can get more out of the first type of player in the long run.

---------------------------------------------
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Posted: 8/21/2014 4:39 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


Our best victory was against Kansas State.  How can you say that?  I can think of several victories far more important than that one.  We beat Georgia there once.  We owned South Carolina and the old ball coach.  Yes, Alabama and LSU beat us handily but both of those games were at their places.  Forget all of Petrino's behavioral contortions, the man could coach and his teams were winning big when he was asked to leave.  Do I want him back?  No.  Do I want the winning back?  Yes. It's time for Razorback fans to be able to feel pride in their football program.  We have been tortured long enough.  Tired maxims like "we are building a foundation" do nothing for me.  I am glad that our players are well behaved, making decent grades and volunteering in the community.  But winning is where it is at.  Like it or not, it allows us to feel good  about ourselves.  It raises our spirits and unites us as Razorback fans.  WE had hope.  Today - not so much!    It's time for that to change starting August 30.  I am just not sure you feel that way when you say that Kansas State was our greatest victory under Petrino.
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Posted: 8/21/2014 11:08 PM

Re: The Glory Years 


We played 5 teams ranked in the Top 5 over a two year period and we lost all 5.  The 2010 teams was as close to a complete team as Petrino fielded, primarily because of some good offensive linemen and a healthy Knile Davis on offense, and Jake Bequette and Jericho Nelson. etc., on defense. The 2011 team generated the most excitement but going from a 14-0 lead to a 42-14 loss against LSU was not an indication of things headed in the right direction.

There was just not enough defense to hold gifted offensive teams under 40. Then, some of our best offensive players graduated and the group that was supposed to replace them contained some guys with questionable character and commitment. One impact player wound up being a felon.

I think BP would have had more years like his last two, but I see no reason to think we had settled in just behind LSU and Alabama in the West, let along perched to challenge annually for championships.  Petrino never coached against Manziel.  He never coached a talent laden Auburn team with Gus calling the shots. The challenges were growing, not diminishing.

I understand the excitement of the offense, but I firmly believe that the offensive strategy helped contribute to losses against superior teams.  There are times when a team needs to control the ball and rely on a good defense, but that just wasn't how Petrino operated.

We were fortunate to have a job opening when Petrino grew weary of the NFL.  He did not make the most of an excellent opportunity, so we will never know what he could have meant for the program long term.

I would gladly accept a clone of the passing game, but not with the total lack of commitment to fielding a good defense nor with the idea that a running play is a wasted down.

By the way, thinking of "building a foundation" as a tired maxim, and expecting us "to turn things around" on August 30th is exactly why we've found ourselves in the messes we've experienced over the last ten years or so.

LC Porkwood wrote: Our best victory was against Kansas State.  How can you say that?  I can think of several victories far more important than that one.  We beat Georgia there once.  We owned South Carolina and the old ball coach.  Yes, Alabama and LSU beat us handily but both of those games were at their places.  Forget all of Petrino's behavioral contortions, the man could coach and his teams were winning big when he was asked to leave.  Do I want him back?  No.  Do I want the winning back?  Yes. It's time for Razorback fans to be able to feel pride in their football program.  We have been tortured long enough.  Tired maxims like "we are building a foundation" do nothing for me.  I am glad that our players are well behaved, making decent grades and volunteering in the community.  But winning is where it is at.  Like it or not, it allows us to feel good  about ourselves.  It raises our spirits and unites us as Razorback fans.  WE had hope.  Today - not so much!    It's time for that to change starting August 30.  I am just not sure you feel that way when you say that Kansas State was our greatest victory under Petrino.
"Someone once told me, 'Time is a flat circle.' Everything we've ever done or will do, we're gonna do over and over and over again."

Last edited 8/21/2014 11:29 PM by NostraHOGus

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