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Tony Gwynn dead a age 54.

Posted: 6/16/2014 10:55 AM

Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


Did not see details,  just the headline.
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Posted: 6/16/2014 10:58 AM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


Died of cancer. Class Act. RIP Mr. Gwynn


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--- bobrog4 wrote:

Did not see details,  just the headline.

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Posted: 6/16/2014 12:05 PM

Dude could get a base hit on... 


... a ball thrown in the dirt.  Amazing hitter.  One of the Best Ever!

Keep a light on some patrols are still out! tribute to Over50Hog

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Posted: 6/16/2014 12:43 PM

Re: Dude could get a base hit on... 


I think the two best natural hitters I ever saw were Tony and Ted Williams. Besides the natural talent they had, the one thing I believe made them so good was they both had the instinct that the most important thing was to make contact. Neither one tried to hit a home run but make contact. I assume they had the best eyes around and coordination of course.
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Posted: 6/16/2014 1:22 PM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


RIP
Above the storm the sun is shining.
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Posted: 6/16/2014 1:30 PM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


I cannot remember all the details but I recall hearing this story: the Padres were in a big game. Gwynn was batting and the count was full. On a close pitch, ump called ball. Review showed it was a good call. When asked later how he could make such a call so confidently in that situation, the ump said: "Tony didn't swing."

Used to love to watch him bat.
Truth is Unkillable
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Posted: 6/16/2014 8:54 PM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


He and Rod Carew are my all time favorite hitters.  Sad...

broeric wrote: I cannot remember all the details but I recall hearing this story: the Padres were in a big game. Gwynn was batting and the count was full. On a close pitch, ump called ball. Review showed it was a good call. When asked later how he could make such a call so confidently in that situation, the ump said: "Tony didn't swing."

Used to love to watch him bat.
Keep a light on some patrols are still out! - RIP over50hog
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Posted: 6/16/2014 9:29 PM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


I was reading the article about him on ESPN, and I had forgotten he wasn't a unanimous HOF selection. I'd really like to see now, a list of the 13 clowns who didn't vote for him.
In the valley of the blind, the one-eyed man is king!!!
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Posted: 6/16/2014 10:06 PM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


One of the best I ever saw. Lifetime .338 hitter and about 3,400 hits. Truly one of the great ones. R.I.P. Tony Gwynn!

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Posted: 6/17/2014 8:43 AM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


Certainly a cautionary tale against the use of chewing tobacco.  Great person that left this earth way too soon.
Keep a light on some patrols are still out!
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Posted: 6/17/2014 12:58 PM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


Great hitter, and I love the pics being floated around Facebook of Tony Gwynn and an aged Stan Musial together. Two guys that could get on base right there!
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Posted: 6/17/2014 6:58 PM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 



armyrazorbacker wrote: Certainly a cautionary tale against the use of chewing tobacco.  Great person that left this earth way too soon.

I didn't want to say anything yesterday to take the focus off his passing, but Gwynn was adamant that his smokeless tobacco caused the cancer.  From a scientific standpoint, salivary cancers are so rare that a definitive connection has not been made, but chew has certainly been related to other oral cancers, not to mention gum disease and assorted cardiovascular ailments.

My father was a man's man, with big hands that got greasy and could fix or break things. Like many WWII vets, he came home from the service as a smoker. Granted, he only smoked when he wasn't active, like in the evenings or when he would sit and visit with his buddies, but my lord he could suck them down when he got going.

The easy chair where he sat and read the evening paper was next to the front door, so he would often open it to let a little smoke out and some fresh air in. I'm sure it occurred to him that I was sitting in the floor watching the smoke waft through the light of the TV.

He had 46 pack years to his credit when he grew violently ill in the tomato fields and started throwing up. It took several weeks to recover from his first major heart attack at the age of 47.  I was 5 years old.  As soon as he felt better, he started smoking again and went on like nothing ever happened.

Six years later,when I was in the sixth grade and the last child at home, I heard a commotion one morning and get up to find my mother trying to get Daddy into the shower.  He had awakened with near total paralysis on the left side of his body, but he insisted on taking a shower before going to the hospital. It devastated him to have his children see him that way. I don't think I had ever seen him cry until then.

After several weeks of rehabilitation at Ft. Roots, his grip returned sufficiently that he could toy with the Indian doctor who got to decide if he could go home.  He took perverse pleasure in squeezing the doc's comparatively soft and small hand until it hurt.

The clots in his brain had subsided, but he never quite got back to 100% on the left side. The doctor reminded him he was a heart patient, too, and told him if he did not undergo a bypass, he would not live until 1984.  Since it was 1978, and he had been in the hospital long enough, the prospect of open heart surgery did not seem appealing.

Somehow, during his transfer from our local County Medical Center to the VA, he had held on to a half pack of Winston's.  It seems hard to believe given his circumstances, but he went out and set on the steps at the VA hospital, and he smoked that half pack.  He never smoked again.

He returned home and ate a steady diet of shredded wheat, pinto beans, salads, and whatever else we grew in the garden.  He lost weight, his color returned, and he began walking for exercise. The hacking cough, that I had always known him to have, disappeared.

Of course he couldn't just drop the nicotine cold turkey. He took up chewing Levi Garrett. Fortunately, all that chewing and all those spit cans never seemed that appealing to me.  While it was a definite step in the right direction, we now know that the nicotine and other chemicals continue to wreak havoc on the cardiovascular system.

He lived another six years, enjoying most of what was left of his good health.  Occasionally though, his lack of vigor seemed to bother him, which is probably why he slipped off without my mother, his usual hunting partner after he became a heart patient, on an unseasonably cold Veteran's Day morning in 1983.  They had set up a deer stand the day before, and he plotted carefully until she was washing her hair to slip away in his modified army jeep.  His sole purpose was to shoot a deer and return with it on display before she even knew he was gone.

My brother-in-law found him a few hours later, lying on his side with his hand under his head, just like when he slept.  His glasses and shotgun lay neatly beside him, as did the bottle of nitroglycerin he had fished out of his pocket when he realized he was in trouble.  I have always hoped that it helped.

He had blood on his pants. He had shot a deer just as he planned that 20 degree morning, and he got the blood on his pants from field dressing it. At some point, he headed back toward his jeep, no doubt realizing something was wrong. His return home ended a couple of months shy of 1984, just as the Indian doctor had predicted. He no longer faced any concerns about oral cancer. He was 59, and lived to know only two of his five grandchildren and four great grand children.

They called me out of class to tell me. I was 17 and a senior. I received a National Merit Corporate Scholarship later that year. I'm sure you can imagine my mixed emotions when the sponsors instructed me to write a letter of thanks for the nice check to my corporate benefactor, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.  I never wrote that letter. I did cash the check.

I read a statistic in an article about Gwynn that startled me. Of those who dip or chew enough to cause that whitish discoloration on the inside of their cheek or gum,  3-5% will develop oral cancer. Just imagine a classroom of twenty young boys who dip, and you can count on at least one of them dying or suffering disfigurement because of a nasty habit.

In the next collective bargaining agreement, baseball players need to grow a pair and end this foolishness of walking around with freaking cancer mash in their cheek. Too many kids all over the country watch them too closely. 

I apologize for getting on my soapbox, but this subject is never far from my mind, particularly around Father's Day.
This boy is Ignorance and this girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased.”  - Charles Dickens
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Posted: 6/17/2014 7:11 PM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


Thanks for sharing that. and I would like to add a comment.

I will be 79 in two months and I swear on a stack of Bibles that the people I knew in life for many years, work, school, friends in general etc.Of that  group the ones who were heavy smokers like two packs a day are all, every one, dead. Mostly heart trouble but several other things but still they are all gone.

The people I knew who were say light smokers, a pack or less a day I would calculate that about 60% of them are dead.

And those who have not smoked for 20 or more years and those who never smoked I see around 90% of them every day.

On occasion I tell young people I see smoking this and on rare occasions, they say they will quit, others laugh of course, but everytime we have a get together of old friends I think of those who are not with us.
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Posted: 6/18/2014 2:43 AM

Re: Tony Gwynn dead a age 54. 


I was hesitant to bring it up as well.  But I think it's an important aspect of the story here.  And I would think that Mr. Gwynn would be all for warning against the use of chewing tobacco.
Keep a light on some patrols are still out!
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